The Horn

Contact Me

Receive Email Updates

Classical Music Is Musical Slow Food

 To  make  a  gastronomic comparison ,  you might  say  that  popular  music  is  musical  fast food ,  and  that  classical  music  is  musical  slow  food .  Please  don't   assume  that I'm  trying  to  make  an  invidious  comparison  and  snobbishly  claim  that  classical  music  is  "superior "  to  popular  music ,  or  that  I'm  trying  to  knock  other  kinds  of music . 

  Just  as  there's  nothing  wrong  with  eating  at  McDonald's   or  Burger  King ,  there's  nothing  wrong  with  enjoying pop  music ,  or  Rock ,  or  whatever .  But  it's  also  wonderful  to  go  to  a  fancy  restaurant  and  eat   gourmet  food .  But  you  don't  have  to  be  rich  to  enjoy  classical  music .  Buying  a  CD  of  the  music  of  Beethoven ,  Bach ,  Mozart  or  other  great  composers  will  set  you  back  a  lot  less  than  going  to  one  of  New  York's  priciest  restaurants ,  and  unlike  a  scrumptious  meal ,  you  can  enjoy  it  for  many  years .

  I  have  sometimes  enjoyed  eating  fast  food ;  I  prefer  Burger  King  to  Mc Donald's ,  though .  But  why  eat  at  McDonald's  when  you  can  enjoy  gourmet  food ?  It's  the  same  with  me  and  classical  music .  Classical  music  is  not  written  for casual  listening ;  it  requires  careful  attention  to  appreciate .  It's  much  more  complex  rhythmically  and harmonically  and in  its  overall  structure . 

  Of  course ,  there  are  many  degrees  of  complexity  in  classical  music ;  Mozart's  Eine  Kleine  Nachtmusik  or  Vivaldi's  Four  Seasons  are  nowhere  near  as  complex  as  say,  a  symphony  by  Bruckner  or  Mahler ,  composers  who  lived  at  a  later  time ,  and  the  music  of  Elliott  Carter  in  our  time  is  even  more  complex  in  many  ways  than  Bruckner  or  Mahler .

  And  there's also  the  question  of  length .  A  typical  pop  concert  will  consist  of  a  series  of  short  songs .  But  a  Bruckner  or  Mahler  symphony  often  lasts  well  over  an  hour .  Wagner  operas  are  a  musical  marathon ;  once  I  attended  one  at  the  Metropolitan  opera ,  and  the  performance ,  including  two  intermissions , lasted  from  about  noon  until  six o'  clock !   So  to  listen  to  classical  music ,  you  have  to  develop  what  the  Germans  call  "Sitzfleisch "  ,  or sitting  flesh  ,  the  ability  to  sit  for  a  long  time  in  one  place  and  concentrate .  And  you  think  the  Titanic   was  long !   Wagner's  massive  Ring  of  the  Nibelung  is  a  cycle  of  four  operas  performed  on  successive  evenings  lasting   about  16  hours ,  not  including  intermissions ,  all  one  larger  story .

  There  are also  very  short  classical  works ,  such  as  brief  piano  pieces  which  you  will  hear  when  a  pianist  gives  a recital  of  varied  works .  And  often  in  classical  music ,  it  requires  repeated  hearing  to  digest  a  work  and  grasp  its  structure  and  meaning .  Some  works  are  immediately  pleasing ,  but  others  can  be  much  more  difficult  to  grasp .  That's  why  recordings  are  so  valuable .  Many  concertgoers  find  the  atonal  music  of  Arnold  Schoenberg  daunting  or  even  downright  unpleasant  to  listen  to  when  they  first  encounter  it  at  a  concert .  But  with  repeated  hearings ,  it  can  start  to  make  much  more  sense ,  and  you  can  even  come  to  enjoy  it .

  Some  people  may  find  the  experience  of  dining  at  a  fancy  restaurant  daunting  too .  How  do  you  pronounce  the  names  of  those  fancy  French  dishes  and  order wine  without  embarassing  yourself in  front  of  the  waiter ?  Escargot  and  Foie  gras  may  even  taste  strange  at  first .  But  practice  makes  perfect .

Posted: Nov 30 2009, 05:32 PM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web