The Horn

Contact Me

Receive Email Updates

Overtures And Preludes To Operas

   Many,  but  far  from  all  operas  have  overtures,  which   set  up  the mood  for  the  action  to  proceed.  Other  have  what  is  called  a  prelude,  which  is  usually  shorter  than  an  overture  and  leads  directly  into  the   curtain  opening   without  coming  to  a  full  close   where  the  audience  can  applaud.  Other  operas,  usually  20th  century  ones,  start  immediately,  without  any  orchestral  introduction.  

   Overtures  and  preludes  often  make  use  of    melodies  or recurring  themes  from  the  opera,   and many  are  staples  at  orchestral  concerts,  where  they   are,  so  to  speak,  the  appetizer  before  the   longer  works  on  the  program,  but  not  always.  In  the  18th  century,  what  we  now  call  the  overture  was  called   the  Sinfonia,  and   usually  consisted  of  thre  parts;  fast,  slow  and  fast.  This  is  how  the  symphony  as  we  know  it  started.  The  operatic  Sinfonia  took  on  an  independent  life   in  the  concert  hall,   and  composers  such  as  Mozart  and Haydn  wrote  many.  In  some  cases,  overtures  which   lead  without  pause   to  the  action  have  been  given  concert  endings   by  composers  for   independent  performance.

  Probably  the  most  famous  opera  overture  is  the  one  to  William  Tell  by  Gioacchino  Rossini  (1792 - 1868 ),  famous  for  his  Barber  of  Seville.  This  overture  achieved  fame,  or  perhaps  notoriety  by  its  use   on  the  Lone  Ranger   on  television.  Hi  Ho  Silver !    But  the  overture   is  from  a  rarely  performed  and  very  long  opera  by  Rossini  about   the  medieval  Swiss  freedom  fighter  William  Tell,  who  fought  against  the  tyrannical  occupation  of  Switzerland  by  Austria,  and  gained  fame  by  supposedly  shooting  an  apple  off  his  young  son's  head,  to  save  his  life.   Other  popular  opera  overtures  by  Rossini  are  those  to  the  Barber  of  Seville,   La  Cenerentola  (Cinderella),  Semiramide  (Sem-ir-ah-mee-day ),  The  Thieving  Magpie,  and  The  Italian  Woman  in  Algiers.

   The  overtures  and  preludes  to  Wagner's  operas  are  very  popular  at  concerts,   ranging  from  the  one to  his  rarely  performed  early  opera  Rienzi,  and  the  Flying  Dutchman,   Tannhauser,  Die  Meistersinger  von  Nurnberg,  Tristan  and  Isolde,  and  the  prelude  to  his  mystical  final  work  Parsifal.   Wagner's  great  Italian  contemporary  Verdi   wrote   popular  overtures  to   the  operas   "La  Forza  del  Destino"(The  force  of  Destiny),  I  Vespri  Siciliani  (The  Sicilian  Vespers),  and   Luisa  Miller. 

   Other   popular  opera  overtures   are  to  Der  Freischutz(The  Freeshooter),  Oberon  and  Euryanthe   (Oy-re-an-teh),  by   German  composer   Carl  Maria  von  Weber,  (1786 - 1826 ),  whose  music   greatly  influenced   the  young  Wagner,  The  Merry  Wives  of  Windsor  by  Otto  Nicolai   (1810- 1849),  Ruslan  and  Ludmilla  by  Russian  composer   Mikhail  Glinka ,  the  father  of  19th  century  Russian  music,  an   opera  based  on  ancient  Russian  legends,  and   Le  Roi  d'Ys,  by  Frenchman  Edourad  Lalo,  based  on   Breton  legends  from  northern  France.

   Many  fanous  conductors  have  recorded  these  overtures  and  preludes , and  also  on  complete  recordings  of them.   There  are  many  fine  albums  of  Rossini  overtures  by   Riccardo  Muti,  Riccardo  Chailly,  Claudio  Abbado  and   Neville  Marriner,  to  name  just  a   few,   and  Wagner   orchestral  excerpt  CDs  by  such  greats  as   Sir  Georg  Solti,  Herbert  von  Karajan,  Wilhelm  Furtwangler,  Otto  Klemperer,  and  Daniel  Barenboim  etc,  and  all  sorts  of  miscellaneous   collections   of  overtures  and  preludes.   Check  arkivmusic.com

 

    

Posted: Oct 26 2008, 08:18 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web