The Horn

Contact Me

Receive Email Updates

April 2010 - Posts

Shakespeare's Hamlet And The Authenticity Movement In Music

  Last  night  I  saw  a  production  of  Hamlet  by  England's  Royal  Shakespeare company  on  PBS .  It  was  certainly  interesting ; a  production  which  updated  the  action  of  the  famous  play  to  the  present  day , with  all  sorts  of  anachronistic  elements  in  the  sets ,costumes  and  props. 

  Hamlet  shot  Polonius  with a  pistol  rather  than  stabbing  him ; you  often saw  the  action  through  a  secret  spying  device  which  was  recording  the  goings  on  without  the  characters  being  aware  of  it .  The  actors  in  the  murder  of  Gonzaga  arrived  by  car, and  so  on.  Shakespeare  certainly  would  not  have  recognized  his  world-famous  play .

  This  has  been  common  in  opera  stagings  for  many  years  now;  Mozart's  The  Marriage  of  Figaro,which  takes  place in  the  18th  century  in  the  castle  of  a  Spanish  nobleman ,  has  been  changed  in  our  time  to  the  resdience  of  a  wealthy  man  living  in  a  luxury  high-rise  New  York  building ;  Verdi's  Rigoletto; which  takes  place  in  16th  century  Mantua  Italy  at  the  court  of  a  licentious  Duke,  has  been  updated  to  New  York  City  among  the  Mafia  dons.

  And  so  forth .  The  Hamlet  production  was  totally  inauthentic .  But  in  our  time  in  the  world  of  classical  music ,  there  has  been  a  movement  to  restore "authenticity"  to  performing  the  music  of  the  past  by  using  the  instruments  of  the  past  in  the  music  of  such  composers  as  Bach,Handel,Haydn,Mozart , Beethoven  and  even  later  composers  known  as  "HIstorically  Informed  Performance "  or  HIP . 

  The  musicians,  critics  and musicologists  who  have  done  all  the  research in  trying  to  recreate  the  music  of  the  past  as  it  supposedly  sounded  have  done  everything  differently  from  musicians  who  use  the  instruments  of  the  present  day ;  they  try  to  be  as  scrupulous  as  possible. Not  every  one,  including  me ,is  absolutely  convinced  of  the  "authenticity"  of  these  performances,  but  it  has  certainly  been  an  interesting  experience  to  hear  what  things  might  have  sounded  like  long  ago.(And  I  can't  emphasize  the  word  might  enough).

  But  you  might  make  comparisons  betweeen  this  and  attempts  to  recreate  the  performance  of  Shakespeare's  plays  as  accurately  as  possible .  I  believe  this  may  have  been  attempted.  Such  a  supposedly  authentic  performace  would  be  vastly  different  from  the  Shakespeare  we  are  accustomed  to  today. 

  At  the  Globe  theater,  there  were  no  sets  as  such; just  the bare  stage .  The  audience  would  have  to  use  its  imagination  in  a  production  of  Hamlet, set  at  the  Danish  Royal  court at  Elsinore.  Or  Verona in  Romeo and  Juliet, ancient  Rome  in  Julius  Caesar   etc.  The  female  roles  were  performed  by  boys  ,  not women . 

  An  "authentic " production  of  Hamlet  would  try  to  create  the  pronunciation  of  Elizabethan  English  as  closely  as  possible .  Linguists  have  a  fairly  good  idea  as  to  how it  was  pronounced,  but  as  no  time  machine  exists ,  we  don't know  exactly  what  it  sounded  like .

  It's  similar  in  HIP  performances;  musicologists  have  some  idea  as  to  how  the  music  of  past  centuries  was  performed .  And  there  were  marked  differences .  Some  18th composers  wrote  treatises  on  how  they  thought  their  music  should  be  performed .  However,  this  is  in  itself  no  guarantee of  anything. Bach  and  Mozart  et  al  have  been  gone  for  a  very  long  time  and we  will  never  know  exactly  what  they  would  have  wanted .

  Interestingly ,  the   HIP  movement  had  its  origin  in  England ,although  it  also  had  roots  in  the  Netherlands  and  Belgium .  But  the  PBS  Hamlet  was  anything  but  authentic.  You  might  think  that  there  would  be  an  authentic  Shakespeare  movement  comparable  to  such  established  English  orchestras  as  the  Academy of  Ancient  Music ,  the  Englsih  Concert,  the  English  Barooque  Soloists  and  the  Orchestra  of  the  Age  of  Enlightenment . 

  Authenticity  is  always  a  Chimera .

 

Posted: Apr 29 2010, 09:35 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Caustic Music Critic Alan Rich Has Died At 85

  Alan  Rich , 85, considered  the  dean  of  American  classical  music  critics,  has  died .  His  reviews  were  always  lively  and  enetertaining ,  if  often  extremely  harsh  and  even  gratuitously  nasty at  times .  But  you  could  never  call  them  boring ! 

  In  the course  of  his  long  career ,  Rich  wrote  for numerous  newspapers ,magazines  and  on  the  internet ,including  New  York  magazine , Newsweek, the  New  York  Times , the  Boston  Herald ,  the  Herald  Tribune, Bloomberg  news ,LA  Weekly  and elsewhere .  At  the  time  of  his  death , he  had  his  own  blog  on  classical  music  called  "So  I've  Heard ",also  the  title  of  his  memoirs . 

  Rich  had  been  based  in  Los  Angeles  for  about  30  years  but  had  previously  lived  in  New  York, where  he  was  music  critic  of  New  York  magazine .

  Rich  was  highly  opinionated  and  his  likes  and  dilikes  were  exstreme; he  adored  Mozart  and  Schubert ,  but  loathed  Brahms ,Bruckner  and  Richard  Strauss , for  example , greatly  admired  such  conductors  as  Carlo  Maria  Giulini  and  Pierre  Boulez  and  wrote  scathingly  of  Zubin  Mehta,  his  Bete  Noire , who  was  the  constant victim  of  his  vicious  attacks.

  Unfortunately , his  prejudices  sometimes  caused  him  to  go  overboard  in  his  attacks  and  to  write  reviews  which  could   be  nothing  short  of  scurrilous .  He  accused  the  controversial  Indian-born  conductor  Zubin  Mehta  of  indifference  to  and  neglect  of  new  music  despite  the  fact  that  he  has  long been  a  staunch  champion  of  it,  and  when  Mehta  was  appointed  music  director  of  the  New  York  Philharmonic in  the  late  1970s  after  many  years  with  the  Los  Angeles  Philharmonic ,  Rich  made  the  ludicrous  prediction that  the  conductor  would  offer  nothing  but  "easy  listening"  in  New  York .

  Yet  when  the  late  Italian  conductor  Carlo  Maria  Giulini  succeeded  Mehta  in  Los  Angeles,  Rich,who  admired  his  conducting  greatly, never  criticized  him  for  the  fact  that  he  conducted  virtually  no  new  music  there , which  was  extremely hypocritical .  As music  critic  of  New  York  magazine, Rich  proceeded  to  savage  Mehta's  conducting  and  choice  of  repertoire  mercilessly . 

  Music  critics, like  the  rest  of  us, are  all too  human .  But  Alan  Rich  had  many  admirers .

 

 

Posted: Apr 28 2010, 08:59 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Some Interesting Classical Cds I Recently Borrowed From The Library

  Here's  a  list  of  some  great  classical  Cds  I've  recently  taken  out  of  the  public  libarary  where  I  live ,  with  comments  on  some  of  them .

  In  no  particular  order :  Die Agyptische  Helena :  Rarely  performed  opera  by  Richard  Straus  about  the  strange  marital  exploits  of  Helen  of  Troy  and  her  husband  Menlaus  after  the  Trojan  war , with  decadently  sumptuous  music .  Soprano  Deborah  Voigt  as  Helen, with  Leon Botstein  conducting  the  American  Symphony  orchestra  on  Telarc  records. 

 Also  by  Richard  Strauss : Daphne ,  based  on  Greek  mythology .  The  beautiful  maiden  Daphne  is  wooed  by  the  God  Apollo . It  doesn't  work  out  and  he  turns  her  into  a  tree !  Georgeously  atmospheric  music .  Renee  Fleming  as  Daphne, Johan  Botha  as  Apollo, with Semyon  Bychkov  conducting  the  Cologne  Radio  symphony  orchestra  on  Decca .

 Samuel  Barber :  Vanessa: One  of  the  most  admired  American  operas, and  the  story  of  the  conflict  between  an  wealthy  and  aristocratic  woman ,  her  lover  and  her  niece .  Almost  as  lush  and  sensual  as  Richard  Strauss .  Leonard  Slatkin  conduting  the  BBC  Symphony  orchestra  on  Chandos  records .

Bedrich  Smetana: Va  Vlast (My  Fatherland ).  Smetana's  great  cycle  of  symphonic  poems  about  what  is  now  the  Czech  Republic.  Sir  Roger  Norrington  and  the  London  Classical  Players  on  Virgin  records .  Uses  period  instruments .

Johannes  Brahms : Symphonies  3  and  4.  Same  conductor  and  orchestra  on  period  instruments ,  EMI  classics.  Brahms  Lite.

Mendelssohn :  Complete  symphonies. Claudio  Abbado, London  Symphony. Discussed  on  my  last  post. DG  records.

Franz  Schubert :  Octet  for  two  violins,viola, cello,  bass, clarinet ,bassoon  and  horn .  Chamber  ensemble  of  St. Martin  in  the  Fields,  Chandos  records .  Schubert's  most  expansive  chamber  work; a  hour  long,  but  so  melodious  you'll  lose  track  of  time.

Richard  Wagner:  Die  Walkure  and  Siegrfied,  from  the  Ring  of  the  Nibelunger  music  dramas.  Part  of  the  legendary  first  complete  Ring  recording  with  the  late  Sir  Georg  Solti  and  the  Vienna  Philharmonic  on  Decca,  with  such  great  singers as  Birgit  Nilsson, Hans  Hotter,  Regine  Crespin, Christa Ludwig,  Gottlob  Frick, Wolfgang  Windgassen  etc. 

Gioacchino  Rossini :  Matilde  Di  Shabran .  A  live  Decca  recording  of  this  long-forgotten  Rossini  opera  about  a  rabid  misogynist  knight  in  Spain  who  eventually  falls  for  a charming  young  lady  of  the  aristocracy ,  with  all  sorts  of  strange  subplots  and intrigue.  Zesty  and  vivacious  music and  plenty  of  opportunity  for  virtuosic  singing ,  with  the  charismatic  Peruvian  tenor Juan  Diego  Florez  as  the  woman  hater .  Conducted  by  Riccardo  Frizza,live  from  the  composer's  birthplace in  Pesaro,Italy .

Giuseppe  Verdi :  Stiffelio .  One  of  Verdi's  26  operas,  and written  early  in  his  long  career. The  story  of  a  minister  and  his  adulterous  wife,  and  how  he  eventually  comes  to  forgive  her.  Stirring  score  by  Verdi , with  Mario  Del  Monaco ,tenor,  as  the  troubled  minister,  and  Oliviero  De  Fabrittis  conducting, live  from  the  Naples  opera.

Sir  Edward  Elgar:  The  Two  symphonies ,  plus  In  the  South  and  Cockgaine  overture .  Sir  Georg  Solti  and  the  London Philharmonic .  Elgar's  two  symphonies  are  grand  and  glorious  works, filled  with  a  mixture  of  dignity ,exuberance  and  nostalgia .

Hans  Pfitzner :  Violin  Concerto, plus  Duo  for  Violin ,cello  and  orchestra.  A  beautiful  violin  voncerto  which  is  vertually  never  performed  by  a  German  composer  and  close  contemporary  of  Richard  Strauss (they  both died  in  1949)  who  deserves to  be  heard  more  often .  Saschko  Gawrilow, violin,  Bamberg  Symphony  conducted  by  Werner  Andreas  Albert.CPO records.

  If  you're  just  getting  into  classical  music , check  your  local  library's  CD  collection  for  classical  CDs  and  DVDs.  Some  have  extensive  selections of  these.  And  if  there  are  CDs  you  would  like  to  have  them  aquire,  ask  a  librarian.  They  are  usually  very  helpful  about  this.

Posted: Apr 27 2010, 08:53 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
The Elegant Symphonies of Felix Mendelssohn

 I've  been  listening  to  an  excellent  four  CD  set  from  Deutsche  Grammophon  records  of  the  five  symphonies  of  Felix  Mendelssohn  with  Claudio  Abbado  conducting  the  London  Symphony  orchestra ,  which  also  includes  a  few  of  this  composer's  other  orchestral  works .

  The  200th  birthday  of  Mendelssohn  was  celebrated  last  year  and  met  his  untimely  death  in  1847 .  But  in  his  relatively  brief  life  he  produced  a  series  of  elegantly  crafted  and  melodious  works  in  virtually  all  musical  genres ,some  of  which  have  been  staples  of  the  classical  repertoire  since  his  lifetime . 

  Mendelssohn  wrote  five  symphonies ,unless  you  count  the  brief  symphonies  for  strings  he  wrote  as  a  child  and  teenager  which  are  almost  never  performed ,  and  of  the  five  only the  third  and  fourth  are  played  with  any  frequency .  The  first  is  the  effort  of  a  teenage  prodigy , and  shows  remarkable  skill  and assurance .

  The  second  is  rarely  performed  and  is  almost  more  of  a  large  scale  cantata  or  oratorio  than  a  conventional  symphony .  It's  known  as  "Lobgesang"  in  German,  or  hymn  of  praise , and  features  two  soprano  soloists  and  a  tenor ,  but  no  bass  for  some  reason .  The  work  uses  passages  from  the  Bible ,and  was  written  in  1840  to  celebrate  the  400th  anniversary  of  Gutenburg's  invention  of  the  printing  press .

  The  main  text  used  is  the  150th  psalm "Let  All  That  Breathe  Praise  The  Lord " , which  has  also  been  set  by  many  other  composers,  including  Anton  Bruckner .  The  work  opens  with  a lengthy  section  that  is  for  orchestra  alone ,  and  procedes  to  the  vocal  part .  The  work  is  vigorous  and  joyous ,  and  deserves  to  be  performed  more  often .

  The  third  was  inspired  by  Mendelssohn's  sojourn  in  Scotland,  and  is  known  as  the  "Scottish "  symphony .  This  visit  also  inspired  his  famous  "Hebrides"  overture ,  which  depicts  the  remote  and  rugged  Scottish  islands  and  Fingal's  cave ,still  a  tourist  attraction . 

  The  symphony  opens  with  a  rathern  solemn  introduction ,  and  the rest  of  the  movement evokes the  stormy  seas  and  the  rugged  Scottish  landscape .  The  vivacious  scherzo  has  a  decidedly  Scottish  flavor  to  it  also ,  and  leads  to  a  songful  slow  movement  which  was  inspired  by  the  composer's  visit  to  the  famous  Holyrood  castle . 

  The  vigorous  last  movement  has  been  described  as  an  evocation  of  the  clans  being  called  to  battle ,  and   concludes  with  a  joyous  hymn-like  peroration . 

  The  fourth,  or  "Italian"  symphony  was  inspired  by  Mendelssohn's  stay  in  that  sunny  country ,  and  is  a  beloved  staple  of  the orchestral  repertoire .  The  first  movement  is  filled  with  energy  and  joy , and  the  second  and slower  movement  is  more  restrained  and  pensive ,  sounding  rather  like  a  solemn  progression  of  religious  pilgrims . 

  The  third  movement  is  a  graceful ,almost  minuet-like  movement,  and  the  finale  is  a  vigorous  Italian  Saltarello , or  leaping  dance .

  The  fifth  is  known  as  the  "Reformation"  symphony  and  is  occaisionaly  performed  but  has  never  achieved  the  lasting  popularity  of  the  thirs  and  fourth  for  some  reason .  It  was  written  to  commemorate  Luther's  Protestant  reformation .  Mendelssohn's  family  was  of  Jewish  origin ,  and  his  grandfather  was  the  famous  Jewish  philosopher  Moses  Mendelssohn , but  his  family  had  converted  to  the  Lutheran  faith  by  the  time  he  was  born . 

  It  too  is  in  the  usual  four  movements ,  and   makes  use  of  Luther's  famous  hymn  "A  Mighty  Fortress Is  Our  God"  and  the  so-called  "Dresden  Amen"  later  used  by  Wagner  in  his  final  opera  Parsifal .  The  outer  movements  are  filled  with  solemnity  and  grandeur ,  with a   graceful  scherzo  and  pensive  slow  movement  in  between . 

  Many  eminent  conductors  have  recorded  the  Mendelssohn  symphonies ,  and  several  have  recorded  sets  of  all  five ,  such  as  the  Abbado  recording  I  just  mentioned  ,    Kurt  Masur , Wolfgang  Sawallisch , and  Herbert von  Karajan . There  are  also  fine  recordings  of  the  individual  symphonies  by  such  famous  maestros  as  Peter  Maag ,  Sir  Georg  Solti , George  Szell,  James  Levine , Riccardo  Chailly ,  and  others . 

Posted: Apr 26 2010, 08:51 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Political Views Of Classical Musicians And Fans

  What  kind  of  political  views  do  classical  musicians  and  fans  tend  to  have ?  It  apears  that  on  the  whole ,  they  tend  toward  the  liberal  side ,  but  there  are  quite  a  few  exceptions . 

  In  recent  years ,  a  number  of  prominent  classical  msucians  have  actually  aired  their  opinions  in  public  at  concerts ,  such  as  the  great  American  pianist  Leon  Fleisher ,  who  when  he  was  a  recipient  of  the  prestigious  Kennedy  Center  awards  recently ,  which  are  seen  on  television  every  year ,  wore  a  peace  sign  as  a  symbol  of  his  objection  to  the  policies  of  then  President  George  W.  Bush ,  or  when  the  famous  Polish  pianist  Krystian  Zimerman  voiced  his  disapproval  of  the  same  at  a  recital  in  America  at  a  recital . 

  Also ,  you  don't  see  American  classical  musicians  and  fans  demanding  that  the  US  government  abolish  the  National  Endowment  For  The  Arts ,  which  is  a  no-brainer .  Classical  music  lovers  tend  toward  the  liberal  side  also,  but  their  political  views  are  hardly  monolithic .

  For  example ,  the  late  William  F.  Buckley , who  was  a  very  cultured  man ,  was  a  great  lover  of  classical  music ,  and  played  the  harpischord  ,not  badly  at  all,  we  are  told .  According  to  reports ,  Newt  Gingrich  is  an  opera  fan . 

  Jay  Nordlinger  of  the  conservative  National  Review ,  is  not  only  a  lover  of  classical  music  but  doubles  as  a  classical  music  critic ,  and  frequently  writes  reviews  and  commentary  on  classical  music  for  that  magazine  and  is  also  the  music  critic  for  the  New  Criterion  and  armavirumque.org .  And  a  very  fine  one  whose  reviews  are  always  very  enjoyable  to  read . 

  Terry  Teachout ,  who  reviews  not  only  classical  music  but  Jazz,  drama  ,film  ,literature  and  dance  for  such  publications  as  the  Wall  Street  Journal  and  Commentary  magazine  etc ,  is  a  conservative  also .  His  blog  is  called  "About  Last  Night ",  but  is  not  usually  about  classical  music .  It's  still  well-worth  reading .

  Recently ,  there  was  an  article  in  the  New  York  Times  on  the  Austrian  conductor  Manfred  Honeck ,  who  recently  became  music  director  of  the  superb  Pittsburgh  Symphony  orchestra , and  was  in  New  York  with  the  orchestra  for  concerts  in  Carnegie  Hall .  The  article  noted  how  the  conductor  is  a  devout  Catholic , and  thus  not  exactly  the  most liberal  type .

  The  political  views  of  classical  musicians  and  fans  seem  to  cover  a  wide  spectrum  of  viewpoints .

 

 

Posted: Apr 22 2010, 09:12 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
A Missed Opportunity For Concerts In 2004

 Continuing  my  discussion  about  how  the  popularity  of  Beethoven  symphonies  has  often  deprived  audiences at  concerts  the  chance  to  hear  lesser-known  but  marvelous  works , 2004  was  the  centennial  of  the  death  of  the  great  Czech  composer  Antonin  Dvorak ,  who  was  born  in  what  is  now  the  Czech  Republic  in  1841 . 

  Dvorak ,like  Beethoven ,  wrote  nine  symphonies . But  for  some  reason ,  only  the  last  three  are  played  with  any  frequency  by  orchestras .  The  ninth  of  course, is  the  world-famous  and  beloved  "New  World "  symphony ,  which  he  wrote  while  living  in  America  for a  few years  during  the  1890s.  This  symphony  has  been  played  to  death  by  orchestras  for  over  a  century ,  making it  all  too  easy  to  take  for  granted .  The  seventh  and  eigth  are  also  quite  popular.

  But  the  first  six  are  delightful  works ,  chock  full  of  great  themes  and  melodic  invention .  There  have been  quite  a  few  recordings  of  them  however,  and  some  have  been  parts  of  complete  sets  of  all  nine  Dvorak  symphonies .  Such  eminent  Czech  and  non-czech  conductors  as  Rafael  Kubelik,  Vaclav  Neumann ,  Libor  Pesek (pronounced  Pesh-ek), (Czech), and  Istvan  Kertesz  and  Witold  Rowicki , to  name  only  some,  have  recorded  all  nine , and  many  of  these  recordings  are  still  available .

  As  far  as  I  know,  no  orchestra , except  possibly  in  the  Czech  Republic ,  has  ever  presented  a  cycle  during  a  season  of  all  nine  Dvorak  symphonies .  Such  a  Dvorak  festival  could  also  have  included  the  various  other  orchestral  works , which  are  also  wonderful, and  the  three  concertos  for  respectively,  cello, violin  and  piano. 

  But  this  could  have  been  a  wonderful  experience  for  audiences , and  an  opportunity  to  hear  the  few  familiar  Dvorak  orchestral  works  juxtaposed  with  the  undeservedly  neglected  ones . But  no .  What  a  wasted  opportunity .

  Incidentally,  there's  an  interesting  story  about  the  numbering  of  the nine  Dvorak  symphonies . Until  about  50  years  ago ,  they  were  numbered  differently ,  and  the  numbers  went  up  only  to  five .  The  familiar  "New  World "  symphony  was  known  as  the  composer's  fifth  symphony, and  the  other  four  also  had  different  numbers from  today . 

 Why ?  Only  five  of  the  symphonies  were  published  during  the  composer's  lifetime .  The  first  two  had  apparently  been  disowned  by  Dvorak,  who  had  written  them  in  his  20s  and  thought  they  were  immature  works  undeserving  of  being  published. The  manuscript  of  the  first  was  lost  for  many  years  and  was  discovered  by  chance  long  after  his  death . 

  So  the  New  World ,previously  known  as  the  fifth,  was  correctly  renumbered  as  the  ninth,  the  seventh ,  which  had  been  known  as  the  second,  became  the  seventh ,  and so  forth .  It  took  Czech  musicologists  some  time  to  sort  out  the  correct  numbering !  

Posted: Apr 20 2010, 08:52 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
You Can Follow Me on Twitter Now !

  I'm  a  Twitter  critter  now ,  and  my  Twitter  name  is  mrclassicalmusi.  No  c  on  the  end.

   I  tried  to  register  as  mrclassicalmusic, but  for  some  reason, I  wasn't  able  to  put  the  final c  on.  But  I  diecided  that  mrclassicalmusi  looked  oddly  appealing ,  and  decided  to  keep  the  name .  So  far ,  my  tweets  have  been  messages  to  the  public  encouraging  them  to  listen  to  classical  music  if  they  don't  already ,and  messages  urging  parents  to  have  their  children  take  up  musical  instruments,  because  of  the  proven  beneficial  effects  of  this  for  those  kids.

  So  please  keep  in  touch  with  me  there,  and send  me messages . 

Posted: Apr 19 2010, 05:45 PM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Are Orchestras Playing Beethoven Too Often ?

  The  Beethoven  symphonies  have  been  staples  of  the  orchestral  repertoire  for  nearly  two  centuries  now , as  well  as  his piano  concertos , the  one  for  violin  and  assorted  other  works for  orchestra .  They're  as  much  a  part  of  the  world's  cultural life  as  the  plays  of  Shakespeare , the  novels  of  Cervantes , Jane  Austen, Hemingway ,etc,  and  the  paintings  of  Goya, Rembrandt  and  Picasso . 

  And  for  a  good  reason ;  they're  among  the  greatest  works  in  the  history  of  classical  music .  An  orchestral  season  without  the  Beethoven  symphonies  would  be  like  Thanksgiving  without  turkeys, Halloween  without pumpkins  and  Christmas  without  Santa  Claus . 

  Recently, the noted  Hungarian  conductor  Ivan  Fischer  presented  a  cycle o f  all  nine  Beethoven  symphonies  divided  between  the  Budapest  Festival  orchestra  and  the  period  instrument  Orchestra  of  the  Age  of  Enlightenment  at  Lincoln  Center .  It  seems  that  orchestras  everywhere  will  perform  Beethoven  symphony  cycles  at  the  drop  of a  hat , even  though  programming  is  done  long  in  advance . 

  In  New  York  alone , the  New  York  Philharmonic  has  done  Beethoven  cycles  under  its  previous  music  directors  Lorin  Maazel  and  Kurt  Masur , and  Nikolaus  Harnoncourt , who  unfortunately  rarely  visits  the  US did one  with  the  Chamber  Orchestra  of  Europe .

  If  you  are  looking  for  recordings of  the  Beethoven  symphonies ,  there  is  a  bewilderingly  vast  number  of  different  versions  available; you  can  get  them  singly  on  one CD  or  sets  with  all  nine  with  one  conductor  and  orchestra . Virtually  every  great  conductor  of  the  20th century  has  recorded  them,  some  in  multiple  versions .  Conductors  ranging  from  Ernest  Ansermet  to  David  Zinman .  Herbert  Von  Karajan  recorded  no  fewer  than  four  complete  sets  of  them  over  a  period  of  about  30  years,  the  last  one  digitally .

  But  could  it  be  that  the  musical  world  has  been  performing  and  recording  too  much  Beethoven ?  Possibly,  when  there  are  so  many  other  symphonies  and  other  orchestral  works  that  are  so  insteresting  and  worth  hearing .  But  audiences  love  to  hear  their  Beethoven  symphonies  at  concerts,  and  they're  a  good  way  to  sell  tickets.  They  might  not  be  so  inclined  to  come  if  a  conductor  is  programs  a  symphony  by  Joe  Schmo .

  Which  is  a  pity .  Beethoven,  Bach  and  Brahms  are  known  as  the  "Thre  Bs. "  Bach  did not  write  any  symphonies ,  but  those  of  Beethoven  and  Brahms have been  played  to  death .  There  are  for  examples,  some  wonderful  symphonies  by  other  Bs,  such  as  the  Russian  Mily  Balakirev (1837-1910) ,  the  Swedish  composer  Franz  Berwald (1796-1868) , Max  Bruch ,best  known  for  a  violin  concerto , (1838-1920) ,  and  the  20th  century  English  composers  Sir  Arthur  Bliss , Arnold  Bax,  and  Havergal  Brian .  You  can  easily  find  recordings  of  their  music ,  but  your  chances  of  hearing  their symphonies  or  other  works  live  are  pretty  slim,  which  is  unfortunate . 

  Other  notable  symphonies  you  will  rarely  encounter  in  the  concert  hall  are  by  the  great  Danish  composer  Carl  Nielsen , although  his  music  is  not  nearly  as  unknown  as  it  used  to  be, the  French  composer  Paul  Dukas ,best  known  for  "The  Sorceror's  Apprentice "  (used  in  Disney's  Fantasia) , Poland's  Karol  Szymanowski , the  first  six  of  Antonin  Dvorak's  nine ,  Russia's  Nikolai  Myaskovsky ,  the  four  of  Frenchman  Albert  Roussel (the  3rd  is  sometimes  heard), to  name  only  a  handful .

  But  some  conductors  have  been  courageous  enough  to  think  outside  the  box  and  perform  and  record  off-beat  orchestral  music  in  our  time,  among  them  the  Americans  Leonard  Slatkin, Gerard  Schwarz,  James  Conlon , and James De  Preist  ,  the  Estonian  Neeme  Jarvi  and  his  son  Paavo , also  a  conductor , and  others .  We  owe  them  a  debt  of  gratitude  for making  orchestral  programming  more  interesting .

  But  remember; there  are  still  youngsters  everywhere  who  might  eventually  grow  up  to  be  lovers  of  classical  music  and  Beethoven  symphonies  are  among  the  most  important  works  for  them  to  get  to  know,  as  well  as  adults  who  have  yet  to  discover  classical  music .  Hearing  a  Beethoven  symphony  for  the  first  time  at  a  concert  could  be  a  thrilling  experience  which  will  fill  them  with  enthusiam  for  classical  music .  Fortunately,  the  Beethoven  symphonies  will  be  played  as  long  as  makind  endures .

 

Posted: Apr 19 2010, 08:45 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
May Opera News Magazine - Opera Around The Globe And International Music Festivals

 The  latest  issue  of  Opera  News  magazine  is  chock  full  of  interesting  articles  on  upcoming  Summer  music  festivals  around  the  world  and  profiles  of  opera  houses  around  the  world , including  the  world-famous Sydney  Opera  house  in  Australia   and the  historic  Semper  Opera  house  in  Dresden ,  where  so  many  great  operas  by  Wagner and  Richard  Strauss  were  premiered . 

  There  are  also  articles  about  opera  houses  in  exotic  places  where  you  might  not  even  expect  them  to  be ,such  as  Cairo,  Hanoi,  and  Cape  Town, South  Africa .  Yes, opera  companies  do exist  there , as  well  as  a  definite  audience  for  opera .  Back  in  the  1970s ,  I  played  a  concert  at  the  Sydney  opera  house ,  which  is  also  the  home  of  the  Sydney  Symphony  orchestra ,  as  a  member  of  the  Long  Island  Youth  Orchestra , when  the  opera  house  was  new .  It  was a  memorable  experience .

  Writer  William  Braun  discusses  the  bizarre  and  wacky  opera  " Le  Grande  Macabre "  by  the  late  Hungarian  composer  Gyorgy  Ligeti ,  which  will  soon  receie  a  semi-stahed  performance  by  the  New  York  Philharmonic  under  its  new  music  director  Alan  Gilbert . 

  There  is  a  comprehensive  list  of  upcoming  concerts ,opera  and  chamber  music  to  be  offered  by  music  festivals  all  over  Europe  and  elsewhere . ( An  later  issue  will  cover  music  festivals  in  the  US.)  The  world's  greatest  conductors , orchestras ,  opera  singers  and  instrumentalists  will  perform  music  ranging  from  Bach,  Mozart  and  Beethoven  to  works  by  contemporary  composers  . 

 Among  the  most prestigious  are  the  Salzburg  festival  in  Austria , the  Wagner  festival  at  Bayreuth,  Germany ,  the  Edinburgh  International  festival  in  Scotland ,  the  Glyndebourne  opera  festival  in  England ,  and  the  Lucerne  festival  in  Switzerland .  There  is  a  comprehensive  list  of  dates, repertoire,  performers  and  e mail  addresses  of  the  festivals .

  And  as  usual  there  are  reviews  of  the  latest  opera  CDs and  DVDs , and  books  on  opera  and  classical  music .  Whether  you're  an  operatic  newbie  or  a  maven ,  you  can't  afford  to  miss  Opera  News  magazine.  You  can  also  visit  their  website  operanews.com.

 

Posted: Apr 14 2010, 09:07 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Do Horn Players Have "The Divine Right To Flub ?

 Ther horn,or French horn as some call it in the English-speaking world,  as is well-known, the most difficult instrument to master and the most accident prone of them all.

 Professional and even amateur horn players live in perpetual dread of missing notes -flubbing, cracking, splattering the note like an insect on a windshield, making "clams" in musicians parlance. In Vienna, home of the unique Viennese horn, even more difficult to play than regular one but which sounds indescribably gorgeous when played by a master, this is known as "making a fish ".

 Audiences and critics notice horn clams, and sometimes on  a particularly bad night, a "clamfest" happens.  But sometimes a captious critic will single out a solo horn player,playing an exhausting part in a long symphony for having missed a note or two, even though he or she had otherwise played beautifully throughout the concert.

 But most likely,they've never played the horn, or even taken a few lessons on it. If they were to have that horn player show them how to play the instrument, they might gain some under=standing of just how difficult thew horn is to play. Sometimes conductors berate ahorn player for missing  a note at rehearsals or after a concert, but this is both futile and counterproductive.

  The higher the note on the horn, the less margin for error there is. The lower notes have much wider intervals between them, but with the high notes,if you off by just a tiny fraction of lip pressure, you skid onto an adjacent note, and that'w how clams happen.

  Recently, Jay Nordlinger of the National Review, who is music critic of  the respected critical website armavirumque.org and also writes on classical music for the National Review as well as politics, attended a concert by the Vienna Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall conducted by the eminent pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim.

  He noted how sure-footed the Viennese horn players were,and how they managed to avoid flubbing . He did not ,however ,mention how difficult the Vienna horns they play are.

 Nordlinger coined an amusing  and clever phrase, noting  how the Viennese players seemed to disregard the "Divine Right To Flub" of horn players.

 Divine right to flub?  It's not a right, but a liability.  In my horn-playing days, depending on what I was playing,I too lived in constant fear of having egg on my face. But what happened,happened, and if something went wrong I didn't dwell on iot for days and become depressed. 

 But auditioning is much more nerve-wracking than actually perforing a concert.  You certainly don't want to mess things up there, but it happens anyway. I've auditioned for such leading orchestras as the New York Philharmonic, Washington National Symphony, the New Jersey Symphony and the Los Angeles Philharmonic among others, and this is not an experience for the faint-hearted ! 

  You're playing behind a screen for members of the orchestra, and although missing one note won't necessarily get you eliminated from the competition, missing a fair number is fatal. There's no "divine right to flub" here.  It's like walking tight rope without a net over hungry lions and a pool of sharks.

  IN performing concerts or opera, some works are of course more difficult than others for horn players. Long symphonies and operas are a trial for your endurance.

 Other works have exposed entrances where you have to come it on a high note after several minutes of not playing, and this is like walking on eggs.

 In some ways, playing the horn is like bull fighting. Like the Toreado facing a bull, you are dealing with something which is extremely risky and unpredicatble. A joke goes "Why is the horn a divine instrument ? That's because man blows into it, and only God knows what will come out !"   

 

 

 

Posted: Apr 13 2010, 09:32 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Conductor James Levine's Health Problems Have The Classical Music World Worried

  Maestro  Jamaes  Levine ,66, will  have  to  cancel  his  performances  with  the  Metropolitan  Opera  and  Boston  Symphony  orchestra , both  of  which  he  serves  as  music  director , for  the  rest  of  the  musical  season  because  of  severe  back  trouble . 

  The  world-famous  conductor  has  been  plagued  by  health  problems  for  some  time  now , including  back  trouble, arm  tremors , the  removal  of  cysts  from  a  kidney  and  an  accident  onstage  after  a  concert  which  broke  the  rotator  cuff  on  a  shoulder , forcing  him  to  cancel  many  performances  of  both  copncerts  and  opera .

  There  has  even  been  speculation  that  he  might  have  to  step  down  from  either  the  Boston  Symphony  or  the  Met ,  and  both  of  these  great  musical  institutions  and  Levine's  many  admirers  are  worried  about  his  uncertain  future  after  so  many  years  of  great  musical  achievements .  The  heavy  responsibilities  of  being  music  director  for  both  have  taken  a  toll  on  his  health .

  Levine's  ailments  have  forced  the  Met  and  BSO  to  struggle  to  find  substitute  conductors  to  fill  in  for  him ,  but  fortunately  a  number  of  distinguished  maestros,  such  as  Fabio  Luisi,  Edo  De  Waart  and  Rafael  Fruhbeck  De  Burgos  and  others  have  been  able  to  replace  him  at  short  notice ,  and  the  Met  does  has  a  staff  of  able  house  conductors  who  can  step  in  at  a moment's  notice .

  Levine  may  have  to  miss  concerts  and  teaching  at  the  world-famous  Summer  home  of  the  Boston  Symphony , the  Tanglewood  festival  in  Massachusetts ,  and  it's  hoped  he  will  be  able  to  begin  the  much-anticipated  new  Ring  cycle  which  begins  at  the  Met  this  September  on  opening  night . 

  The  maestro is  hardly  alone  in  such  health  problems  today ;  former  BSO  music  director  Seiji  Ozawa  has  recently  been  diagnosed  with  cancer  of  the  esophagous  but  is  expected  to  recover  and  has  had  to  cancel  his  performances  at  the  Vienna  State  opera  where  he  is  music  director ,  Leonard  Slatkin,  who  recently  withdrew  from  the  Met's  Traviata  performances  and  is  currently  music  director  of  the  Detroit  Symphony  had  a  recent  heart  attack  but  has  recovered ,  and  the  opera  world  has  been  plagued  with  cancellations by  quite  a  few  top  singers .

  The  bright  side  of  such  cancellations  is  that  they  can  provide  career-making  breaks  for    promising  young  talents .  Back  in  the  1940s, the  25  year  old  assistant  conductor  of  the  New  York  Philharmonic  had  to  fill  in  at  the  last  minute  for  the  great  conductor  Bruno  Walter  (1876-1962),  and  the  concert  was  a  sensation .  That  was  the  young  Leonard  Bernstein ,  and  it  launched  his  legendary  career . 

  You  never  know  what  may  happen  because  of  such  unfotunate  cancellations .Meanwhile,  let's  all  wish  maestro  levine  a  speedy  recovery .

Posted: Apr 12 2010, 08:41 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Conductor James Levine's Worrisome Health Problems

  Maestro  Jamaes  Levine ,66, will  have  to  cancel  his  performances  with  the  Metropolitan  Opera  and  Boston  Symphony  orchestra , both  of  which  he  serves  as  music  director , for  the  rest  of  the  musical  season  because  of  severe  back  trouble . 

  The  world-famous  conductor  has  been  plagued  by  health  problems  for  some  time  now , including  back  trouble, arm  tremors , the  removal  of  cysts  from  a  kidney  and  an  accident  onstage  after  a  concert  which  broke  the  rotator  cuff  on  a  shoulder , forcing  him  to  cancel  many  performances  of  both  copncerts  and  opera .

  There  has  even  been  speculation  that  he  might  have  to  step  down  from  either  the  Boston  Symphony  or  the  Met ,  and  both  of  these  great  musical  institutions  and  Levine's  many  admirers  are  worried  about  his  uncertain  future  after  so  many  years  of  great  musical  achievements .  The  heavy  responsibilities  of  being  music  director  for  both  have  taken  a  toll  on  his  health .

  Levine's  ailments  have  forced  the  Met  and  BSO  to  struggle  to  find  substitute  conductors  to  fill  in  for  him ,  but  fortunately  a  number  of  distinguished  maestros,  such  as  Fabio  Luisi,  Edo  De  Waart  and  Rafael  Fruhbeck  De  Burgos  and  others  have  been  able  to  replace  him  at  short  notice ,  and  the  Met  does  has  a  staff  of  able  house  conductors  who  can  step  in  at  a moment's  notice .

  Levine  may  have  to  miss  concerts  and  teaching  at  the  world-famous  Summer  home  of  the  Boston  Symphony , the  Tanglewood  festival  in  Massachusetts ,  and  it's  hoped  he  will  be  able  to  begin  the  much-anticipated  new  Ring  cycle  which  begins  at  the  Met  this  September  on  opening  night . 

  The  maestro is  hardly  alone  in  such  health  problems  today ;  former  BSO  music  director  Seiji  Ozawa  has  recently  been  diagnosed  with  cancer  of  the  esophagous  but  is  expected  to  recover  and  has  had  to  cancel  his  performances  at  the  Vienna  State  opera  where  he  is  music  director ,  Leonard  Slatkin,  who  recently  withdrew  from  the  Met's  Traviata  performances  and  is  currently  music  director  of  the  Detroit  Symphony  had  a  recent  heart  attack  but  has  recovered ,  and  the  opera  world  has  been  plagued  with  cancellations by  quite  a  few  top  singers .

  The  bright  side  of  such  cancellations  is  that  they  can  provide  career-making  breaks  for    promising  young  talents .  Back  in  the  1940s, the  25  year  old  assistant  conductor  of  the  New  York  Philharmonic  had  to  fill  in  at  the  last  minute  for  the  great  conductor  Bruno  Walter  (1876-1962),  and  the  concert  was  a  sensation .  That  was  the  young  Leonard  Bernstein ,  and  it  launched  his  legendary  career . 

  You  never  know  what  may  happen  because  of  such  unfotunate  cancellations .Meanwhile,  let's  all  wish  maestro  levine  a  speedy  recovery .

Posted: Apr 12 2010, 08:41 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Prokofiev's Thrilling Cantata Alexander Nevsky - Based On His Music To The Classic Eisenstein Film

 You  may  have  seen  the  classic    film  Alexander  Nevsky , by  the  great  Russian  director  Sergei  Eisenstein , based  on  historic  events  in  13th  century  Russia .  Sergei  Prokofiev  wrote  the  music  for  the  1938  movie ,  and  soon  after  made  a  cantata  for  concert  performance  out  of  the  film  score  which  has  thrilled  audiences  ever  since  with  its  grandeur  and  sweep .

 I've  been  listening  to  the  terrifically  exciting  recording  on  the  Philips  label  with  the  chorus  and  orchestra  of  St.Petersburg's  Maryinsky  theater  conducted  by  Valery  Gergiev , which  you  shouldn't  miss . 

  The  film  tells  of  the  heroic  struggle  of  the  Russian  army,  led  by  grand  duke  Alexander  Nevsky  to   defeat  the invading  German  army  of  the  Teutonic  Knights  of  Livonia .  Previously ,  Russia  had  defeated  the  invading  Swedish  army  and  had  to  deal  with  the  conquering  Mongol  hordes .

  The  cantata  opens  with  a  brief  and  gloomy  introduction  entitled  "Russia  Under  The  Mongol  Yoke ".  Then  the  chorus  sings  of  the  recent  invasion  of  the  Swedish  army  in  the  "Song  Of  Alexander  Nevsky ".   Here  is  an  English  translation :  It  happened  by  the  river  Neva  ,  by  the  great  waters .  There  we  cut  down  the  enemy  warriors  of  the  Swedish  army .  Oh, how  we  fought, how  we  hacked  them  down !   How  we  hacked  their  ships  to  pieces !   We  swung  an  axe  and  a street  appeared ,  we  thrust  our  speers  and  a  lane  opened  up .  We  scythed  down  the  Swedish  invaders  like  grass  on  parched  soil.

  We  shall  never  yield  our  Russian  land .  Those  who  attack   Russia  will  meet  their  death . Arise , Russia,  against  the  enemy ,  arise  to  arms ,  glorious  Novgorod !

  The  next  section  is  called  " The  crusaders  in  Pskov "(a  Russian  city ).  The  chorus  sings :  Arise,  Russian  people , to  a  glorious  battle , a battle  to  the  death .  Arise ,  free  people,  for  our  beloved  country !  Honor  to  the  living  warriors  and  immortal  glory  to  the  dead . For  our  native  home,  our  Russian  land ,  arise  Russian  people !  In  our  great  native  Russia ,  no  no  enemy  shall  survive . Arise ,  mother  Russia !  The  enemy  shall  not  enter  Russia ,no  foreign  army  shall  remain  there .  The  ways  into  Russia  shall  be  invisible  to  them;  they  shall  not  ravage  the  Russian  fields .

  Now  comes  the  hair-raising  battle  on   the  ice-covered  river  Neva .  The  German  army  advances ,  singing  a  hymn  in  Latin . "Peregrinus  expectavi  pedes  meos  in  cymbalis .Vincant  arma  crucifera .  Hostis  perenat !  A  pilgrim ,  I  hoped  my  feet  would  be  covered  in  metal .  The  army  of  the  crusaders  shall  conquer .  Death  to  the  enemy !  "

  A  savage  battle  follows.  The  Russian  army  overcomes  the  invaders ,  and  they  sink  into  the  cracked  ice  on  the  river . 

  Now  a  mezzo-soprano sings  a  mournful  song  on  the  "Field  of  death ".  I  shall  go  across  the  snow-covered  field ,fly  over  the  field  of  death .  I  shall  search  out  my  betrothed ,  and  those  glorious  falcons ,  noble  youths .  Here  lies  one  hacked  by  swords ;  here  lies  one  pierced  by  an  arrow.  Their  blood  has  watered  our  beloved  Russian  land .  I  shall  kiss  the  dead  eyes  of  those  who  died  nobly  for  Russia,  and  to  the  one  who  survived,  I  shall  be  a  true  companion  and  faithful  spouse .  I  shall  not  marry  a  handsome  man , for  earthly  beauty  comes  to  an  end .  I  shall  be  married  to  a  brave  man.  Hear  this,  bold  falcons !

  The  final  and triumphant  section  is  entitled  "Alexander's  entry  into  Pskov ".  The  chorus  sings  exultantly :  Russia  has  gone  to  a  great  battle  and  defeated  the  enemy .  No  invader  shall  endure  in  our  native  land .  They  shall  meet  their  death .  Rejoice,  sing ,  mother  Russia .  No  enemy  will  prevail  in  our  native  land .

  No  enemy  shall  set  eyes  on  our  Russian  villages ;  those  who  attack  Russia  shall  die !  All Russia  has  gathered  for  the  great  celebration .  Rejoice , motherland ! 

  Because  of  the  relatively  primitive  sound  technology  of  Russian  films  of  the  time,  Prokofiev's  music  does  not  really  achieve  its  maximum  effect  when  you  see  the  movie .  But  whether  live  or  recorded ,  the  cantata  is  one  of  the  most  thrilling  works  you  are  ever  likely  to  hear  . 

 

 

Posted: Apr 09 2010, 08:34 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Prokofiev's Thrilling Cantata Alexander Nevsky - Based on The music To The Classic Film

 You  may  have  seen  the  classic    film  Alexander  Nevsky , by  the  great  Russian  director  Sergei  Eisenstein , based  on  historic  events  in  13th  century  Russia .  Sergei  Prokofiev  wrote  the  music  for  the  1938  movie ,  and  soon  after  made  a  cantata  for  concert  performance  out  of  the  film  score  which  has  thrilled  audiences  ever  since  with  its  grandeur  and  sweep .

 I've  been  listening  to  the  terrifically  exciting  recording  on  the  Philips  label  with  the  chorus  and  orchestra  of  St.Petersburg's  Maryinsky  theater  conducted  by  Valery  Gergiev , which  you  shouldn't  miss . 

  The  film  tells  of  the  heroic  struggle  of  the  Russian  army,  led  by  grand  duke  Alexander  Nevsky  to   defeat  the invading  German  army  of  the  Teutonic  Knights  of  Livonia .  Previously ,  Russia  had  defeated  the  invading  Swedish  army  and  had  to  deal  with  the  conquering  Mongol  hordes .

  The  cantata  opens  with  a  brief  and  gloomy  introduction  entitled  "Russia  Under  The  Mongol  Yoke ".  Then  the  chorus  sings  of  the  recent  invasion  of  the  Swedish  army  in  the  "Song  Of  Alexander  Nevsky ".   Here  is  an  English  translation :  It  happened  by  the  river  Neva  ,  by  the  great  waters .  There  we  cut  down  the  enemy  warriors  of  the  Swedish  army .  Oh, how  we  fought, how  we  hacked  them  down !   How  we  hacked  their  ships  to  pieces !   We  swung  an  axe  and  a street  appeared ,  we  thrust  our  speers  and  a  lane  opened  up .  We  scythed  down  the  Swedish  invaders  like  grass  on  parched  soil.

  We  shall  never  yield  our  Russian  land .  Those  who  attack   Russia  will  meet  their  death . Arise , Russia,  against  the  enemy ,  arise  to  arms ,  glorious  Novgorod !

  The  next  section  is  called  " The  crusaders  in  Pskov "(a  Russian  city ).  The  chorus  sings :  Arise,  Russian  people , to  a  glorious  battle , a battle  to  the  death .  Arise ,  free  people,  for  our  beloved  country !  Honor  to  the  living  warriors  and  immortal  glory  to  the  dead . For  our  native  home,  our  Russian  land ,  arise  Russian  people !  In  our  great  native  Russia ,  no  no  enemy  shall  survive . Arise ,  mother  Russia !  The  enemy  shall  not  enter  Russia ,no  foreign  army  shall  remain  there .  The  ways  into  Russia  shall  be  invisible  to  them;  they  shall  not  ravage  the  Russian  fields .

  Now  comes  the  hair-raising  battle  on   the  ice-covered  river  Neva .  The  German  army  advances ,  singing  a  hymn  in  Latin . "Peregrinus  expectavi  pedes  meos  in  cymbalis .Vincant  arma  crucifera .  Hostis  perenat !  A  pilgrim ,  I  hoped  my  feet  would  be  covered  in  metal .  The  army  of  the  crusaders  shall  conquer .  Death  to  the  enemy !  "

  A  savage  battle  follows.  The  Russian  army  overcomes  the  invaders ,  and  they  sink  into  the  cracked  ice  on  the  river . 

  Now  a  mezzo-soprano sings  a  mournful  song  on  the  "Field  of  death ".  I  shall  go  across  the  snow-covered  field ,fly  over  the  field  of  death .  I  shall  search  out  my  betrothed ,  and  those  glorious  falcons ,  noble  youths .  Here  lies  one  hacked  by  swords ;  here  lies  one  pierced  by  an  arrow.  Their  blood  has  watered  our  beloved  Russian  land .  I  shall  kiss  the  dead  eyes  of  those  who  died  nobly  for  Russia,  and  to  the  one  who  survived,  I  shall  be  a  true  companion  and  faithful  spouse .  I  shall  not  marry  a  handsome  man , for  earthly  beauty  comes  to  an  end .  I  shall  be  married  to  a  brave  man.  Hear  this,  bold  falcons !

  The  final  and triumphant  section  is  entitled  "Alexander's  entry  into  Pskov ".  The  chorus  sings  exultantly :  Russia  has  gone  to  a  great  battle  and  defeated  the  enemy .  No  invader  shall  endure  in  our  native  land .  They  shall  meet  their  death .  Rejoice,  sing ,  mother  Russia .  No  enemy  will  prevail  in  our  native  land .

  No  enemy  shall  set  eyes  on  our  Russian  villages ;  those  who  attack  Russia  shall  die !  All Russia  has  gathered  for  the  great  celebration .  Rejoice , motherland ! 

  Because  of  the  relatively  primitive  sound  technology  of  Russian  films  of  the  time,  Prokofiev's  music  does  not  really  achieve  its  maximum  effect  when  you  see  the  movie .  But  whether  live  or  recorded ,  the  cantata  is  one  of  the  most  thrilling  works  you  are  ever  likely  to  hear  . 

Posted: Apr 09 2010, 08:34 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Apples And Oranges

 Many  people  have  been  wondering  if one  kind  of music  is  "superior "  to  others , and  a  lot  of  ink  has  been  spilt  lately  on  this vexing  question .  On  one  hand  there  is  the  belief  that  many  have  that  lovers  of  classical  music  think  that  classical  music  is  "superior"  other  musics ,  whether  Pop,  Rock,  Jazz,  Folk  or  whatever , reinforcing  the  notion  that  fans  of  classical  are  a  bunch  of  snobs  and  elitists.

 And  there are  those  who  are  guilty  of  snobbism  in  reverse , sneering  at  classical  as  boring ,  stuffy, elitist ,irrelevant  ,  hopelessly  dated  and  stuck  in  the  past . There  are  apparently  some  supporters  of  classical  music  who  do  consider  it  the  "highest"  form  of  music ,  such  as  the  frankly  elitist  website  musoc.org , which  calls  it  "art"  music , which  I  discussed  some  time  ago  here .

  But  as  they  used  to  say  in  ancient  Rome, "De  gustibus  non  est  disputandum ".  There's  no  use  arguing  over  taste .  Different  people  have  different  preferences  in  music ,  just  as  in  so  many  other  things .  My  preference  happens  to  be  classical .  But  other  people  prefer  other  kinds  of  music .  Where's  the  problem ? 

  For  me  at  least ,  and  many  other  people, classical  music  has  a  complexity  and  emotional  power  that  other  kinds  of  music just  don't  offer .  It's  not  meant  for  casual  entertainment .  It  often  requires  repeated  hearings  to  understand ,  unlike  Rock  or  Pop  music  etc.  Classical  music  can  be  a  challenge  to  the  mind ,  but  making  the  effort  to  listen  to  it  carefully  can  be  incredibly  rewarding .

  Classical  music  isn't  superior  to  other  kinds  of  music,  but  neither  is  it  inferior .  It's  just  very  different  from  them .  Let  classical  be  classical  and  other  kinds  of  music  be  what  they  are .  There's  no  use  blaming  it  for  not  being  like  other  musics,  or  vice  versa .

  But  if  other  people  are  fans  of  other  kinds  of  music ,  that's  fine  with  me .  They  have  every  right  to  enjoy  whatever  kind  of  music  they  do .  Who  am  I  to  argue  with  their  tastes?  Apples  and  oranges .  Can't  we  all  just  get  along ? 

   

Posted: Apr 07 2010, 08:55 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
More Posts Next page »