The Horn

Contact Me

Receive Email Updates

April 2009 - Posts

Will The New York Times Sell WQXR ?

  There  are  oiminous  stories  about  the  possibility  of  the  New York  Times  selling  its  radio  station  WQXR,  the flagship  of  American classical  radio  stations.  If  this  happens,  it  could  be  a  devastating blow  to  classical  music  on  the  radio.  This  great station  could  either  cease  to  exist  or  be  bought  by  another  organization,  possibly  leading  to  dumbed-down  classical  programming  compromising  its  artistic  integrity. 

  But  this  is  hardly  surprising  given  the  current  eeconomic  crisis  and  the  difficulties  the  Times  is  having  of  its  own,  similar  to  newspapers  across  the  country.  Unfortunately,  many  classical  radio  stations  in  America  have  gone  under, and  many  of  those  which  are  still  around  offer  less  than  great  programming,  often  sticking  to  the  most  familiar  warhorses,and  playing  just  isolated  movements  from  famous  works.  Let's  hope  that  WQXR  will  not  suffer  this  fate.

  New  York  without  WQXR  would  be  as  unthinkable  as  the  city  without such  landmarks  as  the  Empire  State  building,  the  Statue  of  Liberty  or  the  Brooklyn  bridge.  In  addition  to  playing  recordings  of  a  wide,wide  classical  repertoire,  it  offers  live  broadcasts  of  concerts  from  around  the  city  and  elsewhere,  taped  concerts  by  great  symphony orchestras  of  Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit,  and  New  York's  own  Philharmonic,  Metropolitan  Opera  broadcasts,  and  much,much  more. 

  WQXR's  announcers  are  the  most  knowledgable  and  enthusiastic  in  the  business,  and  don''t  just  tell  you  what's  playing  but  offer  stimulating  and  informative  commentary.  You  can  hear  everything  from   familiar  masterpieces  by  Bach,  Handel,  Beethoven,  Mozart , Schubert,  Brahms  and  Tchaikovsky  etc,  to  to  music  by  leading  contemporary  composers  such  as  John  Adams,  Philip  Glass, John  Corigliano,  William  Bolcom  and others.  You  can  hear  broadcasts  of  complete  recordings  on  Saturdays  when  the  Met  broadcast  season is  over,  and  taped  live  performaces  from  the opera  houses of  Chicago,  Houston  and  elsewhere.

  For  fans of  the piano,  the  noted  pianist  and  teacher  David  Dubal  has  a  very  interesting  program  on  in  which  he  compares  performances  of  the  same  works  by  many  different  pianists,  famous  and  obscure.  Famous  pianists,  violinists  and singers  etc  sometimes  come  to  the  station  to  be ionterviewed.  And   even  if  you  don't  live in  the  New  York  area,  you  can  listen  on  the  internet  at  WQXR.com,  and  see  their  playlist  every  day.  We can't  afford  to  lose  the  jewel  in  the  crown of  classical  radio.

Posted: Apr 30 2009, 08:21 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Ominous News About WQXR in New York

  There  are  oiminous  stories  about  the  possibility  of  the  New York  Times  selling  its  radio  station  WQXR,  the flagship  of  American classical  radio  stations.  If  this  happens,  it  could  be  a  devastating blow  to  classical  music  on  the  radio.  This  great station  could  either  cease  to  exist  or  be  bought  by  another  organization,  possibly  leading  to  dumbed-down  classical  programming  compromising  its  artistic  integrity. 

  But  this  is  hardly  surprising  given  the  current  eeconomic  crisis  and  the  difficulties  the  Times  is  having  of  its  own,  similar  to  newspapers  across  the  country.  Unfortunately,  many  classical  radio  stations  in  America  have  gone  under, and  many  of  those  which  are  still  around  offer  less  than  great  programming,  often  sticking  to  the  most  familiar  warhorses,and  playing  just  isolated  movements  from  famous  works.  Let's  hope  that  WQXR  will  not  suffer  this  fate.

  New  York  without  WQXR  would  be  as  unthinkable  as  the  city  without such  landmarks  as  the  Empire  State  building,  the  Statue  of  Liberty  or  the  Brooklyn  bridge.  In  addition  to  playing  recordings  of  a  wide,wide  classical  repertoire,  it  offers  live  broadcasts  of  concerts  from  around  the  city  and  elsewhere,  taped  concerts  by  great  symphony orchestras  of  Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit,  and  New  York's  own  Philharmonic,  Metropolitan  Opera  broadcasts,  and  much,much  more. 

  WQXR's  announcers  are  the  most  knowledgable  and  enthusiastic  in  the  business,  and  don''t  just  tell  you  what's  playing  but  offer  stimulating  and  informative  commentary.  You  can  hear  everything  from   familiar  masterpieces  by  Bach,  Handel,  Beethoven,  Mozart , Schubert,  Brahms  and  Tchaikovsky  etc,  to  to  music  by  leading  contemporary  composers  such  as  John  Adams,  Philip  Glass, John  Corigliano,  William  Bolcom  and others.  You  can  hear  broadcasts  of  complete  recordings  on  Saturdays  when  the  Met  broadcast  season is  over,  and  taped  live  performaces  from  the opera  houses of  Chicago,  Houston  and  elsewhere.

  For  fans of  the piano,  the  noted  pianist  and  teacher  David  Dubal  has  a  very  interesting  program  on  in  which  he  compares  performances  of  the  same  works  by  many  different  pianists,  famous  and  obscure.  Famous  pianists,  violinists  and singers  etc  sometimes  come  to  the  station  to  be ionterviewed.  And   even  if  you  don't  live in  the  New  York  area,  you  can  listen  on  the  internet  at  WQXR.com,  and  see  their  playlist  every  day.  We can't  afford  to  lose  the  jewel  in  the  crown of  classical  radio.

Posted: Apr 30 2009, 08:21 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
The Great Clarinettist Stanley Drucker Retires From The New York Philharmonic

 Stanley  Drucker  turned  80  this  year  and  is  one  of  the  world's  greatest  clarinet  virtuosos.  He  has  been  principal  clarinet  there  for  many,many years,  and  joined  the  orchestra  before  he  was  out  of  his  teens !   After  an  astonishing  60  years  with  the  orchestra,  he  will  be  retiring  at the  end  of  this  season,  but  will  continue  to  play  and  teach.

  In his  long  and  illustrious  career,  he  has  played  under virtually  every  great  conductor  of  the  past  60  years,  and  under   renowned  New  York  Philharmonic  music  directors  ranging  from  Dimitri  Mitropoulos  in  the  1950s,  and  successively,  Leonard  Bernstein,  Pierre  Boulez,  Zubin  Mehta,  Kurt  Masur  and  Lorin  Maazel.

  In  addition,  he  has  been  a  regular  solist  with  the  orchestra,  playing  clarinet  concertos  by  Mozart,  Carl  Nielsen,  Aaron  Copland ,  John  Corigliano  and  other  composers,  as  well  as  appearing  as  a  soloist  with  numerous  other  orchestras.  Drucker  has  taught  for  many  years  at the  Juilliard  school  right  next  to  the  New  York  Philharmonic's  home  Avery  Fisher  hall  for  many  years.  His  wife  Naomi  is  also  an  accomplished  clarinettist,  and  has  pursued  a  career  of her  own.  He  has  recorded  a  number  of  important  works  for  clarinet,such  as  the  Nielsen  concerto  and  the  world  premiere  recording  of  the  clarinet  concerto  by  American  composer  John Corigliano  Jr.

  Stanley  Drucker  has  received  virtually  every  award  and  honor  a  musician  could  ever   get ,and  has  toured  all  over  the  world  with  the  New  York  Philharmonic,  recorded  an  enormous  number  of  works  with  it  as  principal  clarinettist, and  has  taught  many  clarinettists  who  have  gone  on  to  successful  careers  in  various  major  American  orchestras.

  Following  in  his  footsteps  will  be  an  extremely  difficult  job, and  the  clarinet  world  is  abuzz  with  anticipation   now  that  his  plum  position  is  finally  open.  Who  knows  who  will win  the  audition,  which  is  certain  to  be  an  arduous  one,even  by  the  difficult  standards  of   orchestral auditions.?   Will  it  be  a  clarinettist  from  another  major  US  orchestra  or  some  young  rising  talent  from  Juilliard  or  other  top  music  schools?   It's  the  opportunity of  a  lifeltime.

Posted: Apr 29 2009, 08:02 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Compsers Who Wrote Nine Symphonies (And More Or Fewer)

  For  some  reason,  the  number  nine  has  long  been  a  superstitious  number  for  many  composers.  It  all  started  with  Beethoven,  who  wrote  nine  symphonies,  the  last  being  the  immortal  "Choral"  symphony  with  the  famous  "Ode  To  Joy".  Other  composers  who  wrote (more  or  less)  nine  symphonies  include  Franz  Schubert,  Anton  Bruckner,  the  Englishmen  Ralph  Vaughan  Williams,  Sir  Malcolm  Arnold,  and  Antonin  Dvorak.

  But  it  isn't  that  simple.  Schubert's  ninth  was  famously  unfinished,and  the  seventh  remains  in  sketch  form,but  later  orchestrated  by  others.  Bruckner  died  before  finishing  his  ninth, but  wrote  two  early  unnumbered  symphonies,one  called  no 0.  Mahler  left  his  tenth  in  sketch  form,and  it  was  later  completed  by  others.

  Joseph  Haydn  worte  no  fewer  than  107  symphonies, although  the  numbering  goes  up  only  to  107.  There  are  41  numbered  Mozart  symphonies, several  early  unnumbered  ones, and  no  no  37.  It  appears  that  Mozart  wrote  only  the  opening  of  what  might  have  been  no  37,  and  another  composer  wrote  the  rest.  The  French  composers  Cesar  Franck  (actually  a  Belgian),  Paul  Dukas  and  Ernest  Chausson  wrote  only  one  symphony  each. Brahms  wrote  four, Tchaikovsky,  Carl  Nielsen,  Bohuslav  Martinu  six,  Sibelius  and  Prokofiev  seven,  Dimitri  Shostakovich  15,  Nikolai  Myaskovsky  27,  etc.

  But  some  composers  became  superstitious  about  the  number  nine ,including  Briuckner  and  Mahler,  who  feared  dying  before  completing  more.  In  our  time,  the  noted  Finnmish  conductor  and  composer  Leif  Segerstam,  born  in  1944,  has  written  more  than  200 !   Some  composers,  such  as  Claude  Debussy,  Maurice  Ravel,  the  Russian  Modest  Mussorgsky,  and  the  German  Max  Reger  (1873-  1916, ) wrote  no  symphonies. Debussy  considered  the  symphony  a  rather  academic  musical  form and  avoided  writing  them,  but  some  consider  his  famous  orchestral  work  La  Mer(the  sea),  to  be  somewhat of  a  symphony. 

  At  the  time  the  second  world  war  ended,  Shostakovich  had  written  8  symphonies.  Nos  7  and  8  were  inspired  by  the  horrors  of the  second  world  war,  and  evoke  the  terrible  suffering of  the  Russian  people. duuring  the  war,  the  7th  being  called  the"Leningrad"  symphony.  Joseph  Stalin,  whose  off and  on  displeasure  with  his  music  had  caused  Shostakovich  so  much  mental  suffering,  was  reportedly  expecting  the  composer  to  write  a  huge,  bombastic  choral  symphony  celebrating  the  end of  the  devastating  war.  But  Shostakovich  wrote  his  brief,  almost  Haydnesque  9th  symphony,  a  work  full  of  mocking  sarcasm,  which  displeased  Stalin  greatly. 

  But  the  great  10th  symphony  was  written  after  Stalin  died  in  1953,  and  the  finale  is  unusually  joyous  and  exuberant  for  Shostakovich,  and  has  been  described  as  an  expression  of  relief  at  the  death  of  the  murderous  tyrant.  The  short  and   brutal   second  movement  has  been  described  as  a  poretrait  of  Stalin.

  You  can  get  recordings  of  all  these  symphonies,  and   ones  by  who  knows  how  many  other  composers  either  singly  or  in  boxed  sets  with  all  a  composers  symphonies  with  one  conductor  and orchestra.  More  than  70  different  conductors  have  recorded  sets  of  all  9  Beethoven  symphonies,  some  more  than  once,  such  as  Herbert von Karajan  (1908-1989),  who  recorded  no  fewer  than  four  complete  Beethoven  cycles  in  his  lifetime. 

  Among  the  conductors  who  have  recorded  all  nine  Beethoven  symphonies  are  such  great  names  as  Arturo Toscanini,Leonard  Bernstein,  George  Szell.  Bruno  Walter,  Bernard  Haitink,  Eugen  Jocheum,  Otto  Klemperer,  Sir  Georg  Solti,  Karl  Bohm, Nikolaus  Harnoncourt,  and  many  others.  The  late  Hungarian  conductor  Antal  Dorati  was  the  first  conductor  to  record  an  integral  set of  all of  the  Haydn  symphonies  in  the  1970s,  and I  have  seen  it  at  Tower  records,  unfortunately  now  out  of  business,in  a  huge  boxed  set .  On  LP,  it  had  previously  been  issued  in  installments .  

  For some  reason,  composers  have  not  been  producing  as  many  symphonies  as  in  the  past,  but  notable  ones  have  been  written  by  composers  such  as  Poland's  Witold  Lutoslawski  and  Krzystof  Penderecki,  England's  Michael  Tippett,  Peter  Maxwell  Davies  and  Robert  Simpson,  Henri  Dutilleaux  of  France,  and  Americans  John  Corigliano,  Christopher  Rouse,  William  Bolcom,  and  others.  The  symphony  is  far  from  dead !

   

Posted: Apr 28 2009, 08:24 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
The Met Broadcast Season Is Over

  The  radio  broadcasts  from  the  Metropolitan  opera  concluded  this  past  Saturday  with   Wagner's  "Twilight  of  the  Gods",  also bringing  the  might  Ring  cycle  to  a  close.  It  was  a  fitting  conclusion  to  an  exciting  season.  One  more  Ring  cycle  will  be  performed,  and  the  Met's  last  performances  of  the  season  will  continue  into  early  May.

  The  audience  was  wildly  enthusiastic  at  the  broadcast,  and  the  loudest  cheers  were  for  the  beloved  conductor  James  Levine,  who  has  been  conducting  there  for  nearly  40  years  since  his  debut  as  a  promising   youngster  in  1971.  Performing  this  colossal  Wagner  opera  is  unbelievably  strenuous  for  all, whether  the  singers,the  orchestra  and  the  conductor.  It;s  the  musical  equivalent  of  the  New  York  marathon.  But  the  hard-working  brass  section  of  the  great  Met orchestra  got  through  with  minimal  blooper,  which  is  amazing. 

  This  season  also  brought  the  long-awaited  debut  of   the  great  conductor  and  pianist  Daniel  Barenboim  at  the  Met  conducting  Wagner's  "Tristan  and  Isolde",  who  finally  managed  to  fit  the  Met  into his  very  busy  schedule  as  music  director  of  the  Berlin  State  Opera  and  his  appearences  with  other  orchestras,  not  to  mention  performing  as  a  pianist. 

  A  number  of  the  radio  broadcasts  were also  broadcast  in  high  definition  in  movie  theaters  all  over  the  US  and  elsewhere,and  have  been  seen  on PBS  telecasts  later.  These  will   eventually  be  released  on  DVD.  Margaret  Juntwait  has  been  the  host  of  the  broadcasts,  along  with  the  renowned   opera  expert,voval  coach  and  stage  director  Ira  Siff.  They  always  describe  the  action  of  the  operas  vividly  and  offer  though-provoking  commentary. 

  The  radio  broadcasts  will  resume  this  December ,  and  next  season  promises  to  be  an  exceptionally  interesting  one,  with   operas  never  performed  at the  Met such  as  Janacek's  powerful  and  moving"From  the  House  of  the  Dead",based  on  Dostoyevsky,  Verdi's  "Atilla",  about  the  infamous  Hun  and  his  conquest  of  Italy,  "The  Nose"  by  Shostakovich,  perhaps  the  most  bizarre  opera  of  all  time,  and  revivals  of   Rossini's  "Armida"  and  "Hamlet",  by  French  composer  Abroise  Thomas,  both  unheard  at  the  Met  for  many  decades. 

  If  your  local  radio  station  does  not  carry  the  boradcasts,  you  can  hear  them  at  sirius.com.  You  can  also  go  to  operanews.com  and  metopera.org  for  more  information.

Posted: Apr 27 2009, 08:39 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
More Classical Music Jokes - Groan !!!

  Here are  some  good  ones.  Puns,  courtesy  of  Steakhausen.com  Musical  food  puns:  Ravelioli. Beef  Ellington.

  Robert  Schumanicotti. Chopin Suey. Nat  King  coleslaw.  Rite  of  spring   rolls.Creme  Boulez.  Puccini  mushrooms.

  Ives  cream.  Chopin  fried  steak. Grieg  salad.  BBQ  pulled  Porkofiev. BeethOven  roasted  chicken.  Bachwurst. Minuet  steak. Salasa Verdi.

  Lohengrin  salad. Bach-la-va.  James Levineroasted  tomatoes.  mMozartishoke hearts.  Tonight's  Menuhin.  Orange  Schubert.

  Bjork  rinds. Bach's  lunch.  Carmina  banana.  Miscelaneous  puns:  Rocky-maninov.Rocky-maninov 2.  Bach to the future.

 Liszterine  mouthwash.  Gustav Molar.  Get  Bach. Gershwinn  bikes.  Baroque Obama. 

  What  do  you  yell  when  you're  about  to  throw  a  piano  down  a  mine  shaft?  See  sharp  or  be  flat.

   What  do  you  call  somebody  who  gets  hit  down there?  A  flat  minor. 

  1rs  musician:  Who  was  that  piccolo I  saw  you  with  last  night?  2nd  musician:  That  was  no  piccolo- that  was  my  fife.

  What's  the  difference  between  a  musician and  a  government  bond?  The  bond  eventually  matures.

  What  do  you  call  a  musician  who  just  broke  up  with  his  girlfriend?  Homeless.

     There  was  a  very  bad  amateur  pianist  who  was  playing  his  piano  one  night, very badly  as  usual.  All  of  a  sudden,there  was a  knock  at the  dorr,  and  three  armed  policemen  were  facing  him.  Startled  and  frightened,the  pianist  asks-"  What  the  hell is  going  on?"  The  arresting  officer  says-  "You're  under  arrest.  There  were  reports  that  somebody  was  murdering  Beethoven  here".

 

   GROAN !!!!!!

Posted: Apr 26 2009, 08:56 AM by the horn | with 1 comment(s)
Filed under:
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Summer Is Never Off Season For Classical Music

 Although  the  regular  season  for  most  of  our  orchestras and  opera  companies  is  coming  to  an  end,  the  Summer  will  be  anything  but  off  season  for  classical  music.  All  over  Europe  and  America,  music  festivals  proliferate,offering  an  enormous  variety  of  music,  ranging  from  ancient  works  to  contemporary ,  with  the  world's  greatest  orchestras,  conductors,  instrumentalists  and  opera  singers.  Some  of  these  performances  will  be  broadcast  over  the  radio  and  the  internet.

  In New  York,  the  Mostly  Mozart  festival,with  its  resident  orchestra  and  numerous  distinguished  guest  musicians  will  be  in  residence  at  Avery  Fisher  hall  at  Lincoln  Center.  The  French  conductor  louis  Langree  is  music  director,  and  many  famous  musicians  and  singers  will  appear  there,playing  music  by  Mozart  and his  contemporaries,  and  other  interesting  fare..

  The  world-famous  Tanglewood  festival  in  western  Massachussetts  is  the  Summer  home  of  the  Boston  Symphony  orchestra,  and  music  director  James  Leviine and  eminent  guest  conductors  will  present  a  variety  of  gala  performances,  including  concert  performances  of  operas.  There  is  also  a  student  orchestra  of  gifted  young  musicians  which will  present  concerts under  maestra  Levine  and  other  conductors,  and  Summer  classes  for  promising  young  composers  and  conductors.

  The  Chicago  Symphony  orchestra  resents  concerts  at  Ravinia  park  outside  of  Chicago,  plus  a  wide  variety  of  other  events,  and  the  Cleveland  Orchestra  presents  concerts  at  the  Blossom  Festival  in  Ohio.  The  Philadelphia  Orchestra  is  in  residence  at  the  Saratoga  Festival  in  upstate  New  York.  In  Santa  Fe ,  New  Mexico,  there  is  the  annual  opera  festival,  offering   operas  familiar  and  unfamiliar  in  a  spectacular  theater  in  the  New  Mexico  desert. 

  The  Cabrillo  festival  in  California  offers  a  wide  variety  of  music  by  contemporrary  composers.  Its  festival  orchestra  is  led  by  Marin  Alsop,  music  director  of  the  Baltimore Symphony  orchestra.

  In  Europe,  the  annual  Wagner  Festival  in  Bayreuth,  Germany ,  performs  nothing  but  Wagner  operas  at  the  world-famous  festival  theater  with  its  sunken  orchestra  pit  where the  orchestra  and  conductor  are  invisible  to  the  audience.  The is  the  oldest  of  all  the  music  fetivals,dating  back  to  1876,  when  the  first  complete  performance  of  Wagner's  Ring  was  presented.  The  festival  is  held  during  July  and  August,and  the  world's  leading  Wagner  conductors  and singers  apear  here.  But  you  have  to  wait  literally  years  to  get  a  ticket !

  The  Salburg  festival  in   Austria ,  held  in  the  picturesque  town  where  Mozart  was  born,also  attracts  the  world's  greatest  musicians. The  great  Vienna  Philharmonic  and  orcher  top orchestras   present  concerts  here,  and  there  are  concerts  and  opera  performances  and  recitals  by  famous  musicians and  singers.Naturally,  the  music  of  Mozart  is  a  prominent  part  of  the  festival. 

  In  rural  England  on  an  elegant  estate, the  Glyndebourne  opera  festival   presents operas  by  Handel,Wagner, Dvorak, and  Verdi  in its  festival  theater.  It's  a  traditional  for  audiences  to  eat picnic  style  on  the  grounds !  The  Edinburgh  festival  in  Scotalnd  features  a  wide  variety  or  orchestral  concerts  and  staged  opera  performances  as  well  as  recitals

  In  Switzerland,  the  Lucerne  Festival  features  the  Lucerne  Festival  orchestra,  a  hand-picked  orchestra  with  musicians  from  the  world's greatest  orchestras  led  by  it  founder,  the  venerable  Italian  maestro,Claudio  Abbado,  plus  opther  visiting orchestras

  This  is  just  the tip of  the  iceberg.  There  are  numerous  other  festivals  in  Vienna, Berlin,  Munich,  Florence, Dresden,  and  other  cities,  small  and  large.  You  can  check  operanews.com  for  further  information.

Posted: Apr 25 2009, 08:19 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Update On The Situation With US Orchestras And Opera Companies

  More  and  more bad  news  seems  to  be  coming  from   the  classicsal  music  world    because  of  the  economic  crisis.  It's  not  a  pretty  picture,  but  classical  music  will  definitely  survive  these  difficult  times.  And  there is  the  possibility  of  greater  government  support  from  the  National  Endowment  For  the  Arts. 

  The  Metropolitan  Opera  has  been  forced to  cancel  its Summer  concert  performances  of  complete  operas  in  the  parks  of  New  York  and   surrounding  Metropolitan  area   which  it  has  been  offering  for  free  for  many  years.  There  will,however,  an  evening  of  arias  open  to  the  public.  I  remember  vivdly  the  Met  concert  performances  on  Long  Island  where  I used  to live,  but  unfortunately,  local  budget  cuts  forced   cancellation  of  the  Long  Island  performances.  I  also  attended  the  free  Summer  concerts  of  the  New  York  Philharmonic  which  have  also  long  been  cancelled.

  The  New  York  City  Opera  is  schduled  to  begin  its  abbreviated   season  at  the  newly  renovated  David  H  Koch  theater  in   Lincoln  Center,  formerly  known  as  the  New  York  State  Theater,  but  unfortunately,  there  is  the  possibility  of  a  strike   firther  shortening  or  even  cancelling  the  season.  The  San  Francosco  and  Los  Angeles  operas  have  been  forced  to lay  off   some  of  those  working   on  staff  in  administration.  The  Washington  National  Opera  in  our  nation's  capitol  has  been  forced  to  cancel  its  complete  production of  Wagner's  Ring  next  season.  The  companyy  has  been  gradually  introcucung  its  productions  of  the  separate  operas  but  will  not  be  able  to  present  a  complete  Ring  Cycle . 

  The  Phoenix  Symphony  in  Arizona  is  threatened  by  economic  problems  and  may  have  to  cancel  auditions  for  opeining  in  the  orchestra.  Other  orchestras  with  financial  problems  include  the  Virginia  Symphony,  Honolulu  Symphony,  the  Shreveport  Symphony  in  Louisiana,  the  Columbus  Symphony  in  Ohio,  the  Minnesota  Orchestra  in  Minneapolis,  and  the  Cincinnati  Symphony  orchestra.

  The  Boston  Symphony  Orchestra  has  been  forced  to  cancel  an  upcoming  tour  of  Europe  under  its  music  director  James  Levine. But  the  good  news  is  that  this  world-famous  orchestra  has  started  to  issue  live  recordinngs  from its  concerts  on  its  own  record  label.  The  Cleveland  and  Philadelphia  orchestras  are  also  having  there  difficulties. 

  Telarc  records  of  Cleveland  is  no  longer  recording  the  Cincinnati  and  Atlanta  Symphony  orchestras,  and   virtually  none  of  the  major  US  orchestras  has  a  recording  contract  with  a  major  record  label.  But the  ever  enterprising  Naxos  label  is  starting  to  issue  recordings  by  such  orchestras  as  the  Seattle  Symphony  and  the  Nashville  Symphony  of  music  by  American  composers.  Yes,  Nashville  has  been  gaining  more  and  more  importance  as  a  center  for  classical  music  in  America,  with  its  high  quality  orchestra  and  opera  company !

  Unfortunately,  the  Baltimore  Opera  and  the  Connecticut  Opera   have  gone  under.  But  there  are  still  more  opera  companies  in  America  then  ever  before.  The  number  of  opera  companies  in  America  has  grown  exponentially  from  the  past,  when  the  only  important  opera  companies  were  in  New  York ,Chicago  and  San  Francisco,  and  there  are  also  more  orchestra than  ever  before,  and  there have  never  been  so  many  first-rate  ones.  You  can't  keep  a  great  art  form  like  classical  music  down.

Posted: Apr 24 2009, 08:22 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Who Says Everybody Hates Modern Classical Music ?

 There's  an  interesting discussion  at   the  classical  music  blog  101cds.blogspot.com   called  "Why   Nobody  Likes  Modern  Classical  Music"  .  This  blog  is  an  excellent  and  informative  guide  for  classical  newbies  on  how  to  go  about  starting  a  classical  CD  collection,  and  it  usually  discusses  famous  classical  works  with  suggestions  for  CDs  to  aquire. 

 But  the  latest  post  asks  the  question"Why  is  new  or  recent  classical  music usually  received  with  such  hostility  or  indifference  by  audiences?"  Good  question.  But  what  exactly  is  "modern  classical  music"?   This  is  a  very  broad  field,  with  an  enormous  number of  composers  in  the  past  50  years  or  so  writing  an  enormous amount  of  music  in a  bewildering  variety  of  styles.  You  have  the  austere  serialists  such  as  Pierre  Boulez,writing  music  which  is  about  as  easy  to  listen  to  as  a  treatise  on  nuclear  physics  is  easy  to  read  for  laymen.  Then  you  have  neo-romantic  composers  writing  in  a more  traditional  style  (sort  of)  modeled  on  the  music  of the  past. 

  Then  you  have  the  minimalists,such  as  Philip  Gl;ass, Steve  Reich  and  others  who  devosed  a   kind  of  music  which  is  seductively  hypnotic  to  some  and  maddeningly  repetitious  to  others.  There  have  also  been  composers  such  as  the  late  American  Lou  Harrison,  who  studied  and  were  influenced  by  non-western  musics  such  the  Indonesian  Gamelan  tradition,  and other  trendy  non-western  influences. 

  The  fact  is,  that  of  you  attend  any  concert  by  one  of  our  symphony  orchestras  where  a  new  or  recent  work  is played,  and  you  talk  to  different  audience  members,  you'll  get  a  variety  of  responses.  Some  may  say  they  hated  the  new  piece,  some  might  really  like,  others  may  say"Well,I'm  not  sure.I'll  have  to  hear  it  again",  and  others  might  be  just  plain  puzzled.  So  it's  not  true  that  everybody  hates  modern  classical  music. It  depends  on  the  audience  and  what  is  being  played.

  For  example,  when  PBS  presented  the  the  New  York  premiere  of  John  Adams'  recent  opera  "Doctor  Atomic"  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera,  the  audience reaction  was  obviously  very  enthusiastic.  When  the  composer  took  a  bow  before  the  audience,  he  was  greeted  with  nothing  but  cheers.   Elliott  Carter,  who  turned  100  this  past December,  has  been  having  amazing  success  in his  Indian  Summer,  and  his  centennial  was  widely  celebrated  all  over  America  and  Europe.  Mind  you,  Carter  writes  music  that  is  incredibly  dense  and  complex,  and  that  looking  for  hummable  melodies  in  his  music  is  like  looking   for  lush  vegetation  on  the  moon.

  New  American  operas  such  as  "Dead  Man  Walking" by  Jake  Heggie,based  on  the  famous  book  about  a  nun  who  befriended  a  death  row  prisoner,  Mark  Adamo's  "Little  Women",based  on  the  classic  novel, Andre  Previn's  operatic  adaption of  the  famous  play"A  Streetcar  Named  Desire",  "The  Ghosts  of  Versailles"  by  John  Corigliano ,  and  "Cold  Sassy  Tree"  by  Carlisle  Floyd,are  only  a  few  of  the  operas  that  have  been  successfully  performed  recently  in  America  and  elsewhere.

  Composers such  as  Americans  Ned  Rorem,  William  Bolcom,  John  Harbison,  Charles  Wuorinen,  Christopeher Rouse,  Joan  Tower,  Steven  Stucky  and  others  are  being performed  everywhere, and  audiences  are  not  always  hostile to  their  music. So  it's  important  to  keep  a historical  perspective;  most  of  the  classical  music written  over  the  centuries  has  been  forgotten anyway,  so  if  many  works  written  recently  don't  make  in  into  the"Canon"  of  classical  music, it's  no  big  deal.

 

Posted: Apr 23 2009, 08:18 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Playing The Horn And Bullfighting -A Comparison

 Last  weekend  I  saw  an  interesting  profile on  60  Minutes  on  CBS  of  the  dangerous  yet  glamorous  world  of  bullfighting  in  Spain. Yes, there's  always  the  risk  of  death  or  serious  injury,  but  the  life  of  a  bullfighter  can  be  very  exciting,to  say  the  least.  Then  it  struck  me  how  similar  bullfighting  is  to  playing  the  horn  in  an  orchestra,  particularly  if  one  has  the  hot  seat  of  the  orchestra,  principal  of  the  section.

  The  bullfighter  has  to  face  a  massive  and  highly  agressive  animal;  the  horn  player  has  to  contend  with  with  what  has  been  described  as  the  wild  beast  of  the  orchestra-  the  horn.  Both  are  extremely  difficult  to  handle  and highly  unpredicatable. You  never  know  whether  either  will  turn  on  you  or  not. It  takes  nerves  of  steel  to  enter  the  arena  or  the  stage  of  the  concert  hall  when  you're  about  to  play  something  difficult,  demanding,  long  and  tiring.

  Of  course,  you  don't  risk  dying  at  a  concert,  but  there  is  always  the  risk  of  failure  at  a  concert,  or  the  opera  pit,  not  to  mention  being  the  soloist  in  a  difficult  horn  concerto.  High  notes  are  a horn  player's  worst  fear.  They're  the  hardest  to  hit  accurately,  and  place  the  most  pressure  on  the  lip,  which can  take only  so  much.  The  risk  of  missing  high  notes  is  so  great  because  the  higher  notes  on  the  horn  require  more  minute  adjustments  of  lip  pressure;  lower  notes  do  not,so  the're  much  easier  to hit. If  you're  off  by  only  a  tiny  fraction  of  lip  pressure,  you  momentarily  hit  an  adjacent  not  above  or  below  what  you  were  aiming  for,  and  you  don't  get  a  clean  attack.  This  is  what  is  known  as  a  "clam".  I't's  very  sdistracting  to  the  audience, and  when  attending  concerts ,I've  observed  people  reacting  with  alarm  to  clams.

  The  lowest  notes  are  difficult  in  a  different  way,  and  hard  to  play  with  power.  Horn  players  usually  specialize  in  being  either  high  or  low  parts;  high  ones  are  the  first  and  third,low  players  the  second  and  fourth.  But  there  are  some  works  with  passages  for  all  the  horns  playing  high  notes,  and  some  with  the  whole  section  playing  low  ones,  so  players  need  to  be  reasonably  good  with  both.

  Then,  there's  the  question  of  endurance.  Some  symphonies,  such  as  those  of  Bruckner  and  Mahler,  can  be  very  long, sometimes  lasting  over  an  hour.  Mahler's  3rd is  the  longest  well-known  symphony,  at  about  90  minutes,  in  SIX  movements !    The  longer  you  play,  and  the  higher  the  part  lies,  the  more  strain  on  the  lips,  and  you  endurance  is  challenged.  After  a  long  rehearsal or  performance,  your  lips  get  tender  and  sore,  and  it  takes  hours  for  the  lip  to  recover.  That's  why, in  long  and  difficult  parts  in professional  orchestras,  the  first  horn  has  an  assisatant  first  to  take  over  playing  at  times  so  he  or  she  can  save  strength  for  the  solo  passages,  and  also  to  double  the  first  part  in  some  passages  to  reinforce  the  sound  of the  horns. 

  But  the  most  exhausting horn  parts  by  far  are  the  terribly  long  Wagner  operas .  I  had  a  teacher  who  sometimes  played  with  the  Metropolitan  opera  orchestra,  and  he  said  that  when  you  play  a  Wagner performance  there,"Your  lips  are  tired  before  the  curtain  goes  up!". In  the  second  act  of  Siegfried,  the  third  of  Wagner's  great  music  dramas  of  the  Ring,  a  solo  horn  player  has  to  play  a  long  and  difficult  solo,mimed  by  the  hero  Siegfried,  playing  his  stage  horn to  awaken  the  sleeping  dragon  Fafner  for  a  battle  to  the  death. 

  This  is  one  of  the  most  dreaded  passages  for  horn,  and  ends  with  a  ringing  high  note.  The  player is  all  alone, playing  unaccompanied,  and  is  walking  on  eggs.  Beethoven's single  opera  Fidelio,  and  Mozart's  opera  Cosi  Fan  Tutte(So  do  they  all),  contain  parts  for  two  or  three  horns  accomapnying  a  soprano  in  arias;  these  are  also  extremely  difficult.  Perhaps  the  most  monstrously  difficult  horn concerto  is  the  one  by  Robert  Schumann  for  four  horns,called  the Konzertstuck,  or  concert  piece.  The  first  horn  part  is  so  horrendously  difficult it's  like  walking  tightrope  without  a  net  over  hungry  lions  and  a  pool  of  sharks !  

  The  first  horn is  the  Matador;  the other  horns  have  a  subsidiary  but  important  position,  but  the  first  horn  gets  all  the  glory, like  the  Matador  in the  end.   

Posted: Apr 22 2009, 08:30 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Also Sprach Zarathustra By Richard Strauss- Nietzsche , Stanley Kubrick And The Enigma Of Life

  When  the  classic  Stanley  Kubrick  Sci-Fi  movie 2001-A  Space  Odyssey came  out  just  over  40  years  ago,  it  made  striking  use  of  the  opening  to  the  great  tone  poem  "Also  Sprach  Zarathustra"  by  Richard  Strauss,  based  on  the  enigmatic  book  by  Nietzsche.  Soon,  the  majestic  opening  was  heard  everywhere,  and  pbecame  a  part  of  popular  culture,  something  which  would  probably  have  puzzled  and  even  disgusted  the  composer  and  the  eccentric  philosopher. The  opening  has  been  used  by  Rock  and  pop  musicians  as  diverse  as  Elvis  Presley,  the  Dave  Matthews  band  and  Phish,  and  could  be  heard  on  television  commercials.

  Strauss  was  an  admirer  of  Nietzxsche  and  was  fascinated  by  the  enigmatic  book"Thus  Spake  Zarathustra,  which  used  the  histrical  figure  of   the  ancient  pre-islamic  Persian  religious  teacher  Zarathustra (Zoroaster  in  Greek)  as  a  figurehead  for  the  pronunciation  that"God  Is  Dead",  and  anti-christian  ideas.  He  read  the  book, or  poem,  and  was  filled  with  enthusiasm.  And  in  the  late  1890s,  he  attempted  to  portray  the  unique  atmosphere  of  the  book  in  music.  The  idea  was  to  represent  the  development  of  man  from  primitive   beginnings  to  the  Nietzschean  concept  of  the  "Superman"(not  Clark  Kent)". !

   Although  you  no  doubt  have  heard  the  majestic  opening  many  times,  you  may  not be  familiar  with  the  complete  Strauss  work,  which  is  both  rhapsodic  and  tightly  organized  in  form.  The  opening  may  be  said  to  represent  the  dawn  of  mankind.  Strauss  calls  it  sunrise.  The  large  orchestra  includes  an  organ.  New  themes  are  introduiced  throughout the  work ,  but  the  opening  motif  of  C-G-C  -sunrise,  recurs  constantly  and  is  constantly  varied.

  This  leads  to  the  section  called  "Of  the  backworldsmen",  leading  to  "Of  the  great  longing"  (or  yearning), and  then  a  stormy  section  called  "Of  Joys  and  Passions".  Next  comes  a  somber  passage  caled  "The  Grave  Song".  This  leads  to  the  section ,right  at  the  middle of  the  work  called  "Of  Science".  Here  Strauss  writes  an  elaborate  fugue,  with  complex  counterpoint.  The  fugue  is  considered  the  most  "scientific"  musical  form. 

  The  next  section  is  called"The  convalescent",  leading  to  a  lilting  waltz-like  section  called  the  dance  song,  with  an  elaborate  part  for  solo  violin. This  section  sounds  very  much  like  a  Viennese  waltz, but  infinititely  more  complex. The  waltz  buiids  up  to  an  orgiastic  climax  with  cymbals  crashing  and  bells  ringing.  The  last  section  is  quiet  and  reflective,  and  bears  the  name  "Song  of  the  night  wanderer". The  ending  is  very  quiet  and  highly  enigmatic.  But  the  work  does  not  end in the  original  C  major,  with  no  sharps  or  flats,  but  in  the  directly  adjacent  key  of  B  major,  with  five  sharps  in  the  key  signature.  But  the  lower  strings  quietly  pluck  the  note  C  three times.

  What  are  we  to  make  of  this  strange  and  enigmatic  work?  A  few  years  ago,  I  read  the  original  Nietzsche  work  in  English,  and  couldn't  make  much  out  of  it.  It's  best  just  to  surrender  yourself  to  the  rhapsodic  beaties  of  the  score  and  forget  the  rest. Many  eminent  conductors  have  recorded  Also  Sprach  Zarathiustra,including  the compoiser.  A  classic  recording,  which  may  be  hard  to  find,  is  by the  Indian-born  Zubin  Mehta  with  the  Los  Angeles  Philharmonic. It  so  happens  that  Mehta  is  a  member  of  the  Parsi  minority  of  India.  They  originally  came  from  Iran(ancient  Persia) ,and  settled  in  India  when  that  country  became  Muslim.  The  Paree  religion  is  also  called  Zoroastrianism,  and  is  based  on  the  ancient  teaching  of  Zarathustra,  who  lived  well  over  2,000  years  ago !

 

Posted: Apr 21 2009, 08:28 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Till Eulenspiegel By Richard Strauss - Portrait of A Medieval Bart Simpson

  A  medieval  Bart  Simpson ?  In  a  way,  there  was  one,  but  he  was  an  adult.  There  are  centuries  old  legends  about  a  prankster  and  rogue  called  Till  Eulenspiegel  in  German,  or  owl's  mirror   in  northern  Germany,  the  Netherlands  and  Belgium by  this  name, who   was  every  bit  as  irreverant  and   a  prankster  as  Bart  Simpson,  but  on  a  much  larger  scale. 

  Like  Paul  Bunyan,  all  manner  of  stories  grew  around  the  mythical  figure ,  and  the  young  Richard  Straus  used  the  legends  to  create  on  of  his  most  popular  and  brilliant  orchestral  works,  Till  Eulenspiegel's  Merry  Pranks.  It's  only  about  15  minutes,  but  is  packed  with   the  most  vivid  orchestral  colors  imaginable,  with  merry  horn  calls,  screeching  woodwinds,  cymbal  crashes,  and  other  percussive  noise  makers  such  as  the  ratchet.  Strauss  wrote the  work  in  1894  at  the  age  of  30,  when  he  was  on  the  conducting  staff  at  the  opera  house  of  his  native  Munich,  which  is  still  an  important  operatic center.

   The  name  of  this  outrageous  prankster  literally  means  an  owl's  mirror.  The  saying  goes  in  northern  Germany  and  the  low  countries  that  man  recognizes  his  folly  and  hypocrisy  no  better  than  an  owl  recognizes  its  image  in  a  mirror.   Till  does  all  manner  of  outrageous  things  in  the  musical  story  Strauss  depicts;  he  oversturns  the  fruit  and  vegetable  tables  at  markets,  pokes  fun  of  the  clergy  and  engages  in  pesudo  intellectual  gibberish  with  learned  professors  at  universities ,  plays  tricks  on  landlords,  shopkeepers,  and  flirts  shamelessly  with  pretty  girls. 

  According  to  Wikipedia,  Till  is  constantly  exposing  the  "vices,  greed,  folly,  hypocrisy  and  follishness  of  those  around  him."  If the  Simpsons  ever  does  a  show  on  the  mature  Bart,  he  would  be  something like  this.  In  the  Strauss  version   of  the  story,  Till's  outrages  escapades  eventually  get  so out  of  hand  that  he  is  accused  of  blasphemy  by  the  church,and  hanged.

  The  tone  poem  is  in  the  form  of  a  Rondo, that  is  a  piece  with  a  main  theme   with  contrasting   melodies in  which  the  main  theme  constantly  recurs.  It  begins  with  a  quiet"once  upon a  time  "  opening,  and  then  a  solo  French  horn  plays  Till's  jaunty  theme,  highly  syncopated  and  not  easy  to  play  at  all.  The  theme  is  constantly  transformed in  the  most  clever  way  throughout  the  piece. 

   Strauss uses such  unusual  instruments  as  the  small  and  shrill  E  flat  clarinet   to  make  screeching  noises,  and   the  whole  rambuctious  piece   reaches  a  climax  where  the  brass  menacingly  announces  that  Till  has  finally  been  caught ,  and  the  death  sentence  is  announced.  Till  is  hanged,  and  the  once  upon  a  time  uopening  returns.  But  the  work  still  ends  uproariously  ,  with   mocking, thumb  nosing  and  raspberries.  Despite  his  ignominious  end,  Till's  merry, irreverent  spirit  will  never  die.

  There  a  a  wealth  of  different  recordings  of  Till  available  on  CD ,  and  such  great  conductors  and  Strauss  specialists  as  Karl  Bohm, Clemens  Krauss  (both  disciples  of  the  composer,  Rudolf  Kempe,  Herbert von Karajan, Fritz  Reiner  and  many  others  have  recorded  this  delightful  piece. Most  recordings  are  coupled  with  other  Strauss  symphonic  peoms,  and  I  even  have  a  very  old  recording  with  the  composer  himself  conducting.! 

Posted: Apr 20 2009, 08:24 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Why Do Conductors Tend To Live So Long ?

  Many  of  the  most  famous  conductors  have  lived  to  ripe  old  ages,  and  have remained  active  conducting  travelling  and  recording  at  an  age  when  most  people  have  been  long  retired.  Why  is  this  so ?  Well,  conducting  can  be  very  strenuous  physically,  and  provides  a  kind  of  aerobic  excercize. However,  some  conductors  are  more  vigorous  and  choreographic  on  the  podium  than  others.  Leonard  Bernstein  was  famous,or  possibly  notorious  for  his  flamboyant ,dancing  podium  manner,and  the  way  he  often  seemed  to  literally  jump  around  on  the  podium,  seemingly  defying  gravity. 

  But  his  teacher  and  total  opposite  Friitz  Reiner  (1888- 1963)  was  famous  for  his  minimalist  gestures,  tiny  beat  and  near  motionlessness  on  the  podium.  Yes,  conducting  can  be  very  strenuous  excercize.  And  conductors  are  sometimes  prone  to  ailments  such  as  bursitis  from  constantly  moving  their  arms.  Conducting  the  enormously  long  and  demanding  Wagner  operas  in  the  theater  may  be  the  most  physically  demanding  effort  of  all.  James  Levine  of  the  Metropolitan  opera  now  conducts  from  a  chair  because  of  his  problems  with  sciatica  and  back  trouble,  but  on  the  basis  of  hearing  his  current  performances  of  Wagner's  monumental  Ring  cycle  at  the  Met  over  the  radio,  he  seems  to  doing  quite  well. 

  The  legendary  Leopold  Stokowski  (1882- 1977)  had  what  was  probably  the  longest  career  of  any  conductor.  Born  in  England  but  of  Polish  descent,  he  moved  to  America  as  a  young   organist  and  embarked  on  a  career  conducting  all  over  the  world  and  gave  his  last  public  concert  at  the  age  of  90 !  And  he  continued  to  make  recordings  until  his  death  five  years  later.  Many  of  his  countless  recordings  are  still  available  on  CD. 

  Another  legendary  podium  figure , the  Italian  Arturo  Toscanini  (1867-1957)  started  out  as  a  cellist  and  conducted  his  legendary  first  performance  in Brazil  at  19  as  a  member  of   the  orchestra  of  a  travelling  Italian  opera  company  when  the  scheduled  conductor  was  unable  to  conduct,  and  went  on  to  an  illustrious  career  which  lasted  over  60  years.  He  gave  his  last  concert  at  the  age  of  87  with  the  famous  NBC  Symphony  orchestra  which  had  been  founded   for  him  to  conduct  in the  1930s,  and  which  disbanded  soon  after  his  death. 

  Unfortunately, at  this  final  concert,which  was  broadcast  by  NBC  radio,  he  seemed  to  have  faltered  while  conducting  an  overture  by  Wagner,  became  disoriented  and  the  performance  momentarily  fell  apart.  He  lived  in  retirement  at  his  home  in  upper  Manhattan  until  his  death  in  1957,  shortly  before  his  90th  birthday. 

  Other  conductors  who  have  had  remarkably  long  careers  are  Otto  Klemperer  (1885-1973),  whom  I   discussed  in  an  earlier  post,  and  gave  his  last  concert  in  1972,  frail  but  still  authoritative,  the  eminent  Englishman  Sir  Adrian  Boult  (1889-1983),  the  Germans  Bruno  Walter  (1876-1962),  Eugen  Jochum  (1902-1887), the  Austrian  Karl  Bohm (1894-1981),  the  Russian  Yevgeny  Mravinsky  (  1903-1987),  and  the  Frenchman  Pierre  Monteux( 1875-1964).

  Montuex  was  a close  friend  of  the  great  Igor  Stravinsky,  and  conducted  the  scandalous  world  premiere  performance  Stravinsky's  "Rite  of  Spring" and  other  famous  works.  He  was  appointed  music  director  of  the  London Symphony  orchestra  at  the  age  of  80 !   In  opur  time,  Andre  Previn  just  celebrated  his  80th  birthday,and  is  still  active  as  a  conductor,composer  and  pianist  ,  and  French  composer/conductor  Pierre  Boulez  has  just  celebrated  his  84th  birthday,  and  is  still  pursuing  an  active  career  on  the  podium,  although  he  has  given  up  conducting opera. 

  Other  outstanding  conductors were  not  so  fortunate  and  died  in  tragically  premature  circumstances.  The  Italian  Guido  Cantelli  (1920-1956),was  a  protege  of  Toscanini  and  his  rise  to  success  was  meteroic,  but  unfortunately  he  died  in  a  plane  crash  at  age  36.  The Hungarian  conductor  Istvan  Kertesz  (1929- 1973),  served  as  music  director  of  the  London  Symphony  and  Cologne  opera  in  Germany,  and  was  in  demand  everywhere,  but  unfortunately,  during  a  conducting  stint  with  the  Israel  Philharmonic,  died  in  a  swimming  accident  in  the  Mediterranean.  The  young  African -American  conductor  Calvin Simmons  (1950-1982) was  conductor of  the  Oalkland  symphony  orchestra  and  was  one one  of  the  fastest -rising  young  conductors  of  his  day, but  died  in  a  boating  accident  while  vacationing  in  upstate  New  York.

   Lorin  Maazel  (1930-),  is  soon  to  conduct  his  last  concerts  as  music  director  of  the  New  York  Philharmonic,  and  was  the  world's first,and  so  far  only,child  prodigy  conductor,  having  begun at  around  the  age  of  ten !  Today,  he  has  more  vigor  than  many  people  half his  age, and  shows  no  signs  of  retiring.  Being  a   major  conductor is  hardly  an easy  life,  but  it  has  its  rewards !

Posted: Apr 19 2009, 08:27 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
Transcribing Classical Masterpieces For Fun And For Profit

  I'ts  not  uncommon  for  certain  classical  works  to  exist  in  more  than  one  form.  Many  composers  have  transcribed  some  of  their  works  for  different  perfomers, such  as  making  orchestral  versions  of  chamber  music,  or  vice  versa,  orchestrations  of  piano  works,  or  versions  of  orchestral  works  for  piano.  In  other  cases,  composers  or  others  have  transcribed  the  works  of  other  composers.

  One  reason  for  these  transcriptions  by  composers  has  been  as  a  good  source  of  extra  income  from  publishers  by  having  works  available  in  more  than  one  form.  For  example,Beethoven  transcribed  his  famous  violin  concerto  for  oiano,  turning  it  into  another  piano  concerto. I  don't  recall  any   live  performances  of  it,  but  several  well-known pianists  have  recorded  it,  such as  Daniel  Barenboim. In  past  centuries,,  before  the  age  of  recordings,  transcriptions  enabled  amateur  musicians  who  liked  to  have  home  music  sessions  with  family  and friends  to  play  certain  orchestral  works  they  would  have  little  or  no  chance  of  ever  hearing  live.

  Yes,  in  the  past,  many  people  played the  piano,  violin  or  other  instruments  for  their  own  enjoyment,  even  though  they  were  not  professional  musicians.  This  has  not  died  out  altogether,  but  was  much  more  common in  the  past  before  recordings  and  the  internet.

  Bach  made  transcriptions  of  some  of  his  violin  or  piano  concertos  in  interchangable  versions. The  legendary  Hungarian  piano  virtuoso  and composer  Franz  Liszt ( 1811-1886), made  a  transcription  of  all  nine  Beethoven symphonies  for  piano,  and  there  have  been  several  recordings  of  these  in recent  years.  And  the  once  famous  Austrian  composer  and  conductor  Felix  Weingartner (1863 -1942),  made  of  transcription  of  Beethoven's  longest  and  most  complex  piano  sonata , the  so-called "Hammerklavier"  sonata,  for  orchestra, and  recorded  it.  WEingartner  was  the  first  conductor  to  record  all  nine  symphonies  of  Beethoven,  and  Brahms,of  course  in  the  original  orchestral  versions.

 A  number  of  the  hundreds  of  songs  for  voice and  piano   by  Franz  Schubert have  had  the  piano  parts  turned  into  orchestral  ones,  and  some  leading  composers  have  done  this,  such  as  HUgo  Wolf  and  Max  Reger.  Concert  bands  in  America  often  play  transcriptions  of  famous  orchestral  works  for  band,  that  is,without  parts  for  strings. These  can  be  very  effective  and  I  played  these at  countles  band  concerts  in  the  past.

  Some  of  the orchestral  works  of  Maurice  Ravel (1875-1937) ,  exist  in  both  orchestral  and  piano  versions,  and  several  of  Debussy's  many  piano  works  have  been  orchestrated  also.  Descri[ptive  piano  works  such  as"L'Isle  Joyeuse"  (the  joyous  island",  and  La  Cathedrale  Engloute" (the  sunken  cathedral)  sound  wonderful   when  skillfully  orchestrated.

  Whether  done  for  simple  profit  or  the  curiousity  of  hearing  alternate  versions,  transcriptions  can  make  life  more interesting  for  both  musicians  and  listeners.

  

Posted: Apr 18 2009, 08:16 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
A New York Musical Institution Closes

 Ah  memories !   This  month,  Joseph  Patelson's  legendary  music  store  is  closing.  It's  been  there  for  so  many  years  on  W  56th  street,directly  behind  Carnegie  hall,  and  has  sold  all  kinds  of  classical  sheet  music,books  and  magazines .  Here,  classical  musicians  and  any  one  who  love  classical  music  could  find  orchestral  scores,  music  for  all  instruments,  books  on  music  theory  and  history  and  magazines.  Famous  classical musicians  went  there  all  the  time  to  shop  for  sheet  music.  It  was  a  New  York  institution.

  I  myself  always  went  there  when  I  would  take  the  Long  Island  railroad  from  Levittown  where  I  used  to  live. It  was  THE  place  for  any  one  involved with  classical  music  to  be.  There  I  couod  always  find  concertos, sonatas  and  other  works  for  horn,  plus  the  books  of  orchestral  excerpts   every  aspiring  classical  musician  studies,  as  well  as  the  full  scores  of  orchestral  works  and  operas.  The  clerks  there  were  often  classical  musicians  themselves,  and  were  very  knowledgable  and  opinionated. 

   But  economic  conditions  and  the  sales  of  classical  sheet music  over  the  internet  have  forced  the  current   owner,  who  is  the  daughter-in-law  of  the  original  owner  Joseph  Patelson,  who  died  in  1992  to  close  the  store  for  good.  There  are still other  classical  music  stores in  New  York,  such  as  the  Juilliard  bookstore  at  Lincoln  center,which  is  open  to the  public  and which  I'm told  has  a  great selection  of   classical  sheet  music  and  books,  but  every  one  will  miss  Patelson's.  It's   like  a  death  in  the  family.

Posted: Apr 17 2009, 07:35 AM by the horn | with no comments
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
More Posts Next page »