June 2009 - Posts

How an iPod can Help your Writing
Thursday, June 25, 2009 10:41 PM
I've said many times in this blog, to be a good writer you have to be a good reader. And you just have to plain read a lot. Can't cook gourmet food if you've only eaten easy mac. But, between working and writing (which I sometimes refer to as my part-time job that just hasn't paid yet) and the nagging urge to do things like eat and sleep, I've been having trouble finding time to read. Sure, I've read plenty of books and short stories and I'm not exactly going to forget how to tell a story or form a sentence, but it's about being in the mood and having the pump primed. Reading can often excite one to write, either through new ideas or simply out of a desire to speak after long being the listener. And that's how it came to me. Listen. I'm allowed to use my iPod while at work so instead of listening to rock and roll all day long (I reserve my jazz and classical music for when I'm writing, usually) I'll listen to audiobooks. Maybe you already do and if so, then more power to ya, but I'd never tried audiobooks before and I've been just thrilled with the experience, not only of having really interesting things to listen to while I'm working but tackling long stories I'd never otherwise have had the chance to read. I'm halfway through the entire, unabridged Lord of the Rings Trilogy after just a week and a half and afterwards I've already procured a copy of Moby Dick (also unabridged). I also found a great collection of classic science fiction stories as read by WIlliam Shatner and Leonard Nimoy. Nimoy reading my all time favorite short story, Robert Heinlien's "Green Hills of Earth:" a nerd's wet dream. I've gotta get my book out soon, because if there were ever to be an audiobook, I'd want Nimoy to do it.

Anyway, after a day of listening to stories I can't help but want to come home and write my own. Uh-oh most be all that Tolkien's rhyming.

Until next time, I'm Eric and I'm an unpublished fiction writer.

by DMI | 3 comment(s)
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
"Don't Let it Sit on Your Desk"
Monday, June 22, 2009 9:39 AM
That's what my mother said, "don't let it sit on your desk." Good advice. You can only edit and rewrite so many times, eventually you gotta try it out there in the real world be happy. And if you are happy with it, then why let it sit on your desk a day? Mail that sucker. Yep, with those seven frank words of encouragement I sent out another round of stories to editors and magazines. You've just got to keep churning them out, send them and then don't wait around for something to happen (chances are it won't) but go right back to writing. Last week was a pretty good one for writing and this one looks just as promising. I'm in a nice schedule of working all afternoon and into the evening but waking up nice and early to write before I go actually earn money. So far I've been hammering out a few hours of writing everyday and thats exactly what you want to do. And oh yea, a novel has been started. I'm Eric and I'm an unpublished fiction writer.
by DMI | 1 comment(s)
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web
The Piling Rejection Letters
Wednesday, June 3, 2009 9:36 AM
It seems like every time I post here I include a sentence that goes something like this, "sent out a few more pieces to mags and got a few more rejection letters back." Though always true you might be wondering what I'm doing with all of these rejection letters. Tossing them? Are they just piling up? Burning them in sacrifice to the gods of creativity? First of all, I consider it a rejection when it has passed a magazine's editorial lead time since I sent them the piece. I keep track of all my submissions using a pretty basic chart. Three columns, one for the name of the story, one for the magazine I sent it to and one for the date I sent it out. If you're trying to be a professional such organization is very helpful. Though not necessary, it certainly makes you feel professional and that counts for something (anything to boost the self esteem when rejection is a way of life, right?). Since most publications say that they will get back to you within a certain amount of time (editorial lead time) once that time has elapsed, if I haven't heard from them I count it as a rejection and go ahead and put the strikethrough effect on that row of my publication progress chart. Anyway, back those rejection letters I do receive. On the advice of my sister, I'm keeping them all stowed away in a folder, printing out those that I receive via e-mail. She told me that when her friend was applying for grad schools, she did this and when she final got an acceptance letter she created a framed collage with snippets (cut-outs of the letter head and phrases like "We regret to inform you that...") from all the rejection letters surrounding her one, full-page acceptance letter. Whether I'll actually do this or not in some modified version is still up in the air (I use every scrap of free time I have to write, I'm not wasting much on thinking about what I'll do with the rejection letters). Staving off fears that this folder will one day become a shoe box and then a moving box and then a storage unit is the only draw back to this plan. Nightmares aside, even if you're not interested in collages or scrapbooks, I say hold on to those rejection letters. They don't get me down and when I look at them, I'm only encouraged to write more, submit more and try harder. Until next time, I'm Eric and I'm an unpublished fiction writer.
by DMI | with no comments
Filed under: , ,
Add to Bloglines Add to Del.icio.us Add to digg Add to Facebook Add to Google Bookmarks Add to Newsvine Add to reddit Add to Stumble Upon Add to Shoutwire Add to Squidoo Add to Technorati Add to Yahoo My Web


This Blog

Syndication