A Thin Line

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March 2012 - Posts

Teen girls finally have a home
Well, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. 


There's a new online art project called "Webcam Tears," which features a string of webcam videos of girls crying. Yep. Crying. The videos range from girls all-out sobbing to silent tears running down their cheeks. There are videos as well as animated GIFs.


According to reports, the project was inspired by a New York video artist who recorded her sadness for a whole year. Of "365 Days: A Catalogue of Tears," Laurel Nakadate wrote, "In a time where showing genitals on the Internet is not shocking anymore, tears are a new form of pornography."


The new project is intended to portray contemporary sadness in a "voyeuristic Internet culture." The project does not actively seek out teen girls, but the site is full of them.


Clearly, teenage girls have way too much time on their hands. Take a look at the project here: http://tempuri.org/tempuri.html


Our take on it? Well, it's good to know that teenage girls finally have a place to call home for all their drama. They can now cry it out in front of a webcam, then post it for all the world to see and share. How wonderful


Where's the site for bad young actresses? Perhaps the two Tumblr sites should link up?

Posted: Mar 29 2012, 02:11 PM by Red On The Head | with no comments
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Y U No Meme?

It looks to me like the world has gone meme – there are memes everywhere. Literally. They've taken over Facebook and Tumblr, and I'm sure other social media as well. 


What is a meme? According to Wikipedia, a meme is an "idea, behavior or style that spreads from person to person within a culture." The word is defined as being something imitated. Online, it's often some pop culture reference done in a hipster fashion. 


Memes are being shared, liked, tweeted and reblogged by the millions. I was shocked the other day when a meme I had posted was re-blogged more than 200,000 times – overnight. 


So I started to think…why are memes so dang shareable? And why do we even care about them?


Memes run the spectrum; there are good ones and there are bad ones. But nearly everyone likes to pass them on, regardless. It makes us all a part of something universal – like we're all in the same club.


Aside from that, they're just funny. And it takes no time for them to go viral, particularly if they're good ones. If they're very good ones, there will be copycat memes, which no one seems to mind. Copycats only add to the life of the meme and, well, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.


So while it is highly likely that I won't be coming up with the next great meme, I will continue to enjoy whatever the newest and best is. 

Posted: Mar 22 2012, 03:38 PM by Red On The Head | with no comments
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They lift and separate – and so much more

Some say you can learn a lot about a woman by what she's wearing. I say you can learn a lot about a woman by what she's not wearing. Just check out her underwear drawer. 


When it comes to bras, all women are basically hoarders. One survey said that  each woman has, on average, nine bras in their underwear drawers at any given time, half of which they actually wear. 


Where did they find that group of women? They must be men in drag, because no self-respecting woman I know would have less than 15 bras in her drawer. That's because we have some for comfort, some for work, some for play, some for dates, some for "getting lucky," and some for special occasions. We have some for support and some for no support. We have some to wear with halter tops, some to wear with criss-cross strappy tops, and some to wear with tops that have no straps. We have some that fit and some that used to fit. 


We also usually have weekend bras, boost-the-bosom bras, bras in every color for every outfit, birthday bras, anniversary bras, and even revival bras, for when the flame is flickering toward extinction in our relationships. 


In short, most women keep an ungodly amount of bras.


In the 1970s, lots of women burned their bras. It was all about feminine liberation. All it did was liberate saggy breasts. I'm convinced that those women had a drawer full of replacement bras at home, so burning one didn't really inconvenience those bra-burning chicks. 


I still remember my first bra. It was white with a blue bow nestled between the girls. I thought it was so pretty that I ran into the other room and lifted my shirt to show it off to my two brothers. They're still in therapy for that one.


My euphoria didn't last, however. I soon learned to hate the thing, and as soon as I got to school, I ditched the bra and stuffed it in my book bag or desk. And just before school was out for the day, I'd make a bathroom run and put it back on. No one was the wiser.


I'd go on, waxing poetic about my memories of wearing pretty bras or even those basic ones that are made to only lift and separate – nothing else. But I suddenly feel the need to head to Victoria's Secret...


Posted: Mar 15 2012, 12:07 PM by Red On The Head | with no comments
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All I need to know in life I learned from Dr. Seuss

March 2 was the 108th anniversary of Dr. Theodor Seuss Geisel's birthday, but you probably remember him simply as Dr. Seuss. The latest incarnation of Dr. Seuss' work, "The Lorax," is in theaters now and is kicking butt at the box office. The man is unstoppable even now. 


But why is this? It's because everything you need to know in life you can glean from Dr. Seuss' writings. Here are the life lessons I learned from the creator of the cat in the hat and many other awesome creatures…


• "Why fit in when you were born to stand out?" Oh, so true. If you are different in any sort of way, and you've ever tried to fit in to what society has deemed "normal," then you know how futile it is. Celebrate your different-ness. 


• "You'll miss the best things if you keep your eyes shut." Walk through life with your eyes wide open and you'll see more, do more, learn more and be more. Dr. Seuss was one smart cookie.


• "Teeth are always in style." Smiling doesn't hurt anyone. Including yourself.


• "I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living. It's a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. Which is what I do. And that enables you to laugh at life's realities." 


• "Everything stinks 'til it's finished." Yep. Finish what you start, and don't judge the project in the works.


• Dr. Seuss taught me to be myself and love who I am. "Today you are you, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You."


• The good doctor also taught me to "carpe diem" or "seize the day." Live in the moment, if you will. "You have brains in your head, You have feet in your shoes, You can steer yourself in any direction you choose; You're on your own, And you know what you know, You are the guy who'll decide where to go."


Perhaps my favorite bit of advice from Dr. Seuss is this: "Live with intention. Walk on the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regrets. Appreciate your friends. Continue to learn. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is."


That just about covers it, Doc.

Posted: Mar 06 2012, 01:35 PM by Red On The Head | with no comments
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Imagine this with a little vocal fry, right?

Anybody else remember the whole valley girl thing? It was so, totally like, gag me with a shoe, right?


But think about it…those valley girls had power. They influenced an entire generation to talk like them. It was like, totally outer limits. I admit it. I did it, too. But then again, I was young and easily influenced. But are the only ones affected young and easily influenced?


Not at all. We're all influenced in the lingo we use. And it can come from the teenagers around us to celebrities on TV to, well, just about anyone. We hear a phrase that sticks, and suddenly we're peppering our everyday conversation with, like, stuff.


Some of the more recent trends include uptalk, where you complete every sentence as if it's a question; slang words, such as bitchin', ridic, or like; and today's latest, the vocal fry, which is where you add a little growl to whatever you're saying or singing.


These vocal trends are often associated with the young, and are seen as immature or even stupid. But are they? Many linguists, say this is, like, ridic. The trends that we see and hear each day are used as an interactional tool and a stylistic end point. 


Women are also associated with these trends, much more so than men. Vocal fads seem to have their roots in the feminine set. But a recent study showed that men tend to use "like" more commonly than women in everyday conversation. 


But the good news is that these trends are around for a while, then they're gone. So like, don't get all mental. It will all be ending soon right?

Posted: Mar 01 2012, 12:26 PM by Red On The Head | with no comments
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